INDIAN MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

TYPES OF INDIAN MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS:

There are different types of musical instruments in India. Some of them are,

  • Sitar:

The word sitar is derived from the Persian word sehtar, meaning “three-stringed.” The sitar is a plucked stringed instrument, originating from the Indian subcontinent, used in Hindustani classical music. It has a long, broad, fretted neck and a gourd-shaped body. The sitar’s signature sound is produced by the string vibrating on a flat bridge with a gently curved surface.

  • Saraswati veena:

Veena represents the system of Indian music. Saraswati veena is one of the major types of veena today. The veena is played by sitting cross-legged with the instrument held tilted slightly away from the player. The word veena in India was a term originally used to generally denote “stringed instrument”, and included many variations that would be either plucked, bowed, or struck for sound.

  • Ghatam:

It is a clay pot with a narrow mouth. From the mouth, it slants outwards to form a ridge. Made mainly of clay backed with brass or copper filings with a small number of iron filings, the pitch of the ghatam varies according to its size.

  • Flute:

The flute is one of the most popular instruments in the band. The flute is a family of musical instruments in the woodwind group. The sound is created when the air is passed through the cavity and the holes in the flute. Over the history of the flute, the shape and size of the embouchure have been experimented with and changed from round to oval, oblong to square, big and small. The main 3 types of the flute are the standard, piccolo, and harmony flutes.

  • Tabla:

Tabla is a pair of small hand drums, one of which is slightly larger than the other, used in Indian classical music. The tabla is the most commonly played drum set in North Indian music. The tabla consists of two drums, the baya or the left drum, and the Dayan or the right drum, but the collective name for both the drums is tabla.

  • Mridangam:

The mridangam is a double-sided drum whose body is usually made using a hollowed piece of jackfruit wood about an inch thick. The two mouths or apertures of the drum are covered with a goatskin and laced to each other with leather straps around the circumference of the drum.

  • Nadaswaram:

The nadaswaram, nadhaswaram, nagaswaram, nagasvaram is a double-reed wind instrument from South India. It is used as a traditional classical instrument in Tamilnadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, and Kerala. The nadaswaram has seven finger-holes, and five additional holes drilled at the bottom which can be stopped with wax to modify the tone.

  • Tanpura:

The tanpura is a long-necked plucked string instrument. The electronic tanpura was invented in the late 19th century. It has a resonator and 4 strings, but no frets, as the notes are always played whole.

  • Jaltarangam:

It consists of a set of ceramic or metal bowls filled with water. The bowls are played by striking the edge with beaters, one in each hand. The instrument works on the principle of the motion of sound created or modified with the aid of water. When the edge of the bowl filled with water is stuck with wooden sticks it produces vibrations, that travel through the water and are transferred to the surrounding air to produce sweet melodic sounds.

MOON

ABOUT MOON:

The Moon is the fifth largest satellite in the Solar System, and it is the second-brightest object in the sky after the Sun. The Moon has a radius of 1.737 kilometers / 1.079 miles and a diameter of 3.474 km / 2.158 mi. It is only 384.400 km / 238.855 mi away from Earth. The Moon orbits the Earth once every 27 days. The Moon is unique in that it is the only spherical satellite orbiting a terrestrial planet.

MOON IS MADE UP OF:

The Moon is made of rock and metal—just like the Earth and the other rocky planets (Mercury, Venus, and Mars). Like the Earth, the Moon has layers. The innermost layer is the lunar core. It only accounts for about 20% of the diameter of the Moon. Outside the core is the largest region of the Moon, called the mantle. The lunar mantle extends up to a distance of only 50 km below the surface of the Moon. The outermost layer of the Moon is called the crust, which extends down to a depth of 50 km.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF MOONS PHASES :

There are 8 different types of moon phases. Some of them are,

  • New moon:

New moon occurs when the moon is on the same side of Earth as the sun. New moons generally can’t be seen. They cross the sky with the sun during the day, and the moon’s shadow side is pointed toward Earth. A new moon is visible only during a solar eclipse.

  • Waxing crescent:

The waxing crescent phase is the moon’s first step toward fullness. In this phase, the moon is completely invisible (while it’s new) until a tiny sliver is illuminated. The moon is considered a crescent only when less than one half of it is visible.

  • First-quarter:

First Quarter Moon is the second primary Moon phase when the Moon has reached the first quarter of its orbit around Earth, hence the name.

  • Waxing gibbous:

The waxing (growing) gibbous Moon rises afternoon, transits the meridian after sunset, and sets after midnight.

  • Full moon:

The full moon is the lunar phase when the Moon appears fully. This occurs when Earth is located between the Sun and the Moon. A full moon occurs about once a month when the earth, sun, and moon are in a line and the earth is between the other two. The sun fully illuminates the side of the moon we can see from the earth. The full moon is the midpoint of the lunar cycle, which is the 29-day period from one new moon to the next.

  • Waning gibbous :

The Waning Gibbous Moon rises after sunset but before midnight and doesn’t set until after sunrise.

  • Third-quarter:

The Third Quarter Moon is when the opposite half of the Moon is illuminated compared to the First Quarter. Which half you see lit up depends on where you are on Earth. Only 50% of the Moon is illuminated during its third-quarter phase.

  • Waning crescent:

The waning crescent is the last phase of the moon. During this phase, the illuminated part of the moon gets smaller and smaller, until the cycle meets its end, starting again with the new moon.

Master Box Office Week 1: Thalapathy Vijay Starrer Crosses Rs 200 cr Worldwide, Rs 100 cr From Tamil Nadu Alone

Master Box Office Week 1: Thalapathy Viay starrer and Lokesh Kanagaraj-directorial has crossed the big benchmark of Rs 200 crore worldwide. Smashing records everyday

Thalapathy Vijay and Vijay Sethupathy starrer Master has taken over the Box Office with an unprecedented collection. The film has set the reviving tone at the ticket window and has already crossed the big benchmark of Rs 200 crore worldwide. After its one week’s collection, the Lokesh Kanagaraj-directorial is the fourth Vijay starrer to have reached Rs 200 crore at the worldwide Box Office after Mersal, Sarkar, and Bigil. Check out the worldwide Box Office breakup of Vijay’s films: Also Read – Master Box Office Day 7: Thalapathy Vijay, Vijay Sethupathi’s Film is Set to Cross Rs 100 Crore Mark in Tamil Nadu

Master has registered a fabulous Rs 200 crore at worldwide Box Office within eight-day of its release. The film has crossed Rs 100 crore benchmark in Tamil Nadu alone

Master has been an achiever in every sense at the Box Office. It has just not brought back the audience to the theatres but has also created hopes for filmmakers and exhibitors for the revival of cinema on the big screen. Apart from the ardent Vijay fans, it has invited the family audience to the theatres and that’s one of the biggest achievements of Master.

The film ended up beating Hollywood biggies Wonder Woman 1984, and Tenet within three days of its release in the UAE. With back-to-back records it’s making at the Box Office, Master has emerged as the biggest pandemic release in the world so far.

Watch out this space for all the Box Office latest updates on Master!

MASTER THE BLASTER

5 INDIAN MYTHOLOGICAL FICTIONS ONE MUST READ

India has a very rich and diverse cultural heritage. If you study India’s history, you will see the lavish lifestyle of the people back in the days. But it is not limited to recent few centuries only. This richness goes way back to the times of gods and goddesses. All this is recorded in the books of literature of the Indian heritage. 

India also has a wide range of books and scriptures one can read if they are into Indian mythological genre or simply mythological genre.

It is a country famous for its wars and folklores and hundreds of things that make Indian history quite an interesting subject. Most of us have grown up listening to these stories by our grandparents. 

Some of the authors have revamped these stories in their creative imagination. Some characters are taken from the most famous stories of Indian history and represent a different aspect of those stories. These have been widely appreciated and loved. Here’s a list of top 5 Indian Mythological fictions one must read at least once:

  1. The Pandavas series by Roshan Chokshi:

An amazing book for the youngsters that tells the story of a young 12-year-old girl named Aru Shah. Her family runs the Museum of Ancient Indian Art and Culture in America. Things turn around for Aru when her friends force her to rub an ancient lamp which releases a sleeping demon. Next thing you see is Aru on an unexpected adventure to set thighs straight by finding the reincarnations of the Pandavas and her journey through the kingdom of death. The series has not yet been completed. But is humorous and full of adventure. The author subtlety and cleverly connects the ancient world to the modern world. 

  1. The Palace of Illusions by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni:

You might have heard the epic of Mahabharata many times. But have you heard it from the perspective of the one major cause behind the war, Draupadi? The Palace of Illusions tells this epic from the perspective of Draupadi, her feelings, how she struggled to find a loving home all her life and how she felt when she might have felt when she was gambled away in a game of chess by her five husbands. The book sums the story in 360 pages and tells her side of the story.

  1. Shiva Trilogy by Amish Tripathi:

One of the most beloved books of people, the Shiva trilogy is a must on this list. Amish Tripathi is known for his storytelling and lucid writing. He intertwines the story of Lord Shiva with a fictional background. He beautifully narrates how a common man because of deeds and karma become a God for people. The first part is The Immortals of Meluha, the second The Secret of  Nagas and the third is The Oath of Vayuputras. This is a must-read for all the Shiva as well as mythological lovers. 

  1. The Ramchandra series by Amis Tripathi:

Another brilliantly written series by the author Amish Tripathi is his second expression into the world of mythic-fiction. Like his previous work, The Shiva Trilogy, The Ramchandra series is also a bestseller. This time Amish explores the epic of Ramayana, each book from the perspective of the three main characters the epic revolved around. The series consists of two books Scion of Ikshavaku and Sita: Warrior of Mithila. This series is much better than the Shiva Trilogy in terms of storytelling and plot. The first part, i.e., Scion of Ikshavaku is from the perspective of Lord Ram, the second part, Sita: Warrior of Mithila is from the perspective of Sita, Lord Ram’s wife. Now the third book of the series is awaited which will be from the perspective of Ravana. 

  1. Asura: Tale of the Vanquished by Anand Neelakantan:

Anand Neelakantan is famous for his books on the two most famous epics of Indian history, Mahabharata and Ramayana. The story follows the original storyline of the original Ramayana but what is different about this book is that it tells you the story from the perspective of Ravana. It gives you the story of the other side, the side which is never told while telling the Ramayana. It is a fresh approach towards the epic of Ramayana and is a page-turner.

There are several other books which are worth giving a read. The list could go on and on. These Indian authors have brought a different perspective of the stories we have heard like a hundred times before.

These books are worth your time. After all who wouldn’t love to divide into the royal, fantasy land even if you only get to experience it through a book and your imagination.

How to Make a Presentable Resume

Job selection depends on many things like education, experience, body language and a good resume. Most people do not know how to make a strong resume. So here is an article explaining this.

A resume is a document created and used by a person to present their background, skills, and accomplishments. It is a documentary record of your contact details, educational qualifications, skills and employment history in a nutshell. As it establishes your details, it should be appealing and convincing. A good resume increases your chances to get employed in a company.  To build an attractive resume, you need to find out the best resume format. Resume format plays a vital role while creating a job-winning resume. You should be well-versed about the kind of resume format that suits your current situation. 

Importance of a resume

Employers use resumes to get a deeper understanding of candidate skills, strengths and experience. Your resume should reflect achievements, awards, education, experience and any other outstanding accomplishments that align with your career path and goals. Here are some reasons why you need a resume to get your next job. An effective resume:  

  • Outlines your relevant skills and experience. A well-structured resume clearly highlights your most attractive skills and experience to potential employers. 
  • Displays the benefits you offer employers. More importantly, it should tell employers what you bring to the company along with skills and experience.
  • Grabs the attention of employers. Usually the top quarter of the resume is considered the most attention-grabbing. Make sure to include important summarized information in this part.
  • Matches your skills to the position’s need. One way to do this is by making sure your resume contains the same keywords found in the job description.
  • Can lead to an interview with the employer You’ll likely need to conduct at least one interview to be offered a position, so having a resume is essential.

What does a Resume Contain?

  • Name with contact Information- Your postal address, email and mobile number.
  • Objective: It appears just below the contact information. It briefly describes the type of job you want and also skills that make you the best candidate for the job. The skill related keywords should be present in this section e.g. – Software languages known etc.
  • Education- All your educational qualifications, the most recent first.
  • Work Experience-the company, job title and responsibilities etc. with most current experience on top.
  • Achievements, Training & Certifications if any
  • Other Skills, Interests and Hobbies.

Tips for Writing a Resume:

  • First write down all the details that you want to include in your resume.
  • Select a format
  • Be simple, brief and straight
  • Do not lie about your qualifications and experience
  • Sometimes resumes are filtered by keywords, so see that the words associated with the job are included.
  • Don’t leave unexplained gaps in the timeline. (a year off etc. )
  • Do not copy someone else’s Resume
  • Ask your friend or a teacher to review the content. Revise and Edit.
  • Avoid fancy fonts and colours
  • Print it on one side of the sheet only. Limit it to one page if possible, else 4 pages should be the maximum.
  • Use A4 size paper to write the resume.