Sustainable Development

Sustainable development refers to development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. It is the idea that human societies must live and meet their needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Sustainable development attempts to minimize greenhouse gases, reduce global warming, preserve environmental resources, and provide communities that allow people to reach their fullest potentials. The concept of sustainable development formed the basis of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. The summit marked the first international attempt to draw up action plans and strategies for moving towards a more sustainable pattern of development. It was attended by over 100 Heads of State and representatives from 178 national governments. 

Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland, the first woman prime minister of Norway was asked to chair a United Nations commission to address “a global agenda for change.” She came to make strong impact on the commission’s work, widely referred to as the Brundtland Commission. She developed the broad political concept of sustainable development in the course of extensive public hearings. Brundtland has become known as the “mother of sustainability” since the release of the 1987 report, Our Common Future

Pillars of Sustainability:

The three pillars of sustainability are a powerful tool for defining the Sustainable Development problem. This consists of the Social, and Environmental, and Economic pillars.

Social Sustainability:

Social Sustainability is the ability of a social system, such as a country, family, or organization, to function at a defined level of social well-being and harmony indefinitely. Problems like war, endemic poverty, widespread injustice, and low education rate are symptoms of a socially unsustainable system.

Environmental Sustainability:

Environmental Sustainability is the ability of the environment to support a defined level of environmental quality and natural resource extraction rates indefinitely. This is the world’s biggest actual problem, though, since the consequences of not solving the problem now are delayed, the problem receives too low a priority to be solved.

Economic Sustainability:

Economic Sustainability is the ability of an economy to support a defined level of economic production indefinitely. Since the Great Recession of 2008, this is the world’s biggest apparent problem that endangers progress due to environmental sustainability.

Sustainable Development Goals:

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the global goals, includes 17 interlinked goals, addressing global challenges, including poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace, and justice. In 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the SDGs intending to meet the target by 2030. The goals are a blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all.

  1. No Poverty – End poverty in all its forms everywhere. 
  2. Zero Hunger – End hunger, achieve food security and improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.
  3. Good Health and Well-Being – Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all of all ages.
  4. Quality Education – Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all.
  5. Gender Equality – Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.
  6. Clean Water and Sanitation – Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all.
  7. Affordable and Clean Energy – Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all.
  8. Decent Work and Economic Growth – Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all.
  9. Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure – Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.
  10. Reduced Inequalities – Reduce inequality within and among countries.
  11. Sustainable Cities and Communities – Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.
  12. Responsible Consumption and Production – Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns.
  13. Climate Action – Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts.
  14. Life Below Water – Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.
  15. Life on Land – Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.
  16. Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions – Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.
  17. Partnerships for the Goals – Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development.

Benefits of solo travel

These days, an increasing number of modern explorers are taking vacations by themselves. As the solo travel movement goes from strength to strength, we are highlighting some of the positive aspects of taking a trip on your own. Here is my look at the benefits of solo travel.

You can be completely selfish

This may be the only context in which selfishness isn’t a bad thing. Traveling with others means making plans with others. Checking out local landmarks, museums, restaurants, and attractions can be challenging when each traveler has something different in mind. But what if you could spend each day in any way you like? Fancy spending six hours in a single museum, or trekking for miles in chilly conditions? Go right ahead.

You meet interesting people

When you travel with others, you typically stick together. In other words, you’re less likely to wander away from your group. But traveling alone brings something truly valuable to the table – you’ll be more likely to chat with locals, meet new friends and generally be more sociable. 

You come to know yourself more intimately

These days, we’re constantly bombarded by stimulation – relentless connectivity to others, as well as the Internet. Rarely do we get the chance to sit with ourselves and simply be. Solo travel provides the opportunity to do just that. Being on your own in a new place serves as a permission slip to slow down, without the distractions you’d feel buzzing around you when traveling with companions. Being alone, and embracing it, is a wonderful part of solo travel.

You can rest without feeling guilty

Feeling wiped out from a long flight? Or from exploring a new city on foot? Let’s face it, there’s only so much running around you can do. But when you’re traveling with friends, the pressure to keep going can be intense. When traveling alone, on the other hand, you can head back to your room for a guilt-free mid-afternoon nap.

Traveling alone can provide the restful break you need. Photo: Darkydoors/Shutterstock

You step outside your comfort zone

When traveling with friends, you often troubleshoot travel hiccups together. Can’t find your way around? The solution usually comes by talking it over. Taking a trip on your means you have to get out of any tricky trip situations by yourself, which can help with problem-solving, dealing with pressure, and developing self-belief. 

You’re less likely to feel stressed out

When you’re out and about with your usual friends from home, it’s easy for old routines and group dynamics to creep up on you. Not so when you’re on your own. You’re there for you and you alone – the only drama you’re going to experience is the drama you make yourself.

You’ll have the time and inspiration to work on creative projects

Been dying to delve into a creative project? Whether it’s writing poetry, developing a new business plan, or playing the guitar, traveling alone provides the opportunity – and inspiration – to tap into these desires. When you’re untethered to the demands of others you’ll probably find it easier to nurture your creativity.

It might make you happier in the long term

Research suggests that getting into vacation mode has the potential to increase our happiness levels. And spending time alone has also been shown to stave off depression. The takeaway? Heading off on a solo adventure just might be good for your overall well-being.

Solo travel can help you develop new skills. Photo: Daxiao Productions/Shutterstock

You’ll probably improve your language skills

What better way to learn a new language than to throw yourself in headfirst? Full immersion in a foreign culture (and tongue) is possibly the best way to dismantle the language barrier. When traveling with others, you’re more likely to rely on them for help with translating. And, let’s face it, chances are high that you’ll communicate with one another in your native language. When you’re alone, on the other hand, you’re forced to constantly practice the new language.

(With reference from outlook.com)