Communication & it’s Process

“To effectively communicate, we must realize that we are all different in the way we perceive the world and use this understanding as a guide to our communication with others.” – Tony Robbins

Communication is fundamental to the existence and survival of humans as well as to an organization. Communication is actually the act of conveying information from one place, person, or group to another. The complexity is why great communication skills are deemed so desirable by employers around the world: accurate, effective and unambiguous communication is actually extremely hard.

Every communication involves (at least) one sender, a message, and a recipient. This may sound simple, but communication is actually a very complex subject.

The transmission of the message from sender to recipient can be affected by a huge range of things. These include our emotions, the cultural situation, the medium used to communicate, and even our location.

It is a process of creating and sharing ideas, information, views, facts, feelings, etc. among the people to reach a common understanding. Communication is the key to the Directing function of management.

A manager may be highly qualified and skilled but if he does not possess good communication skills, all his ability becomes irrelevant. A manager must communicate his directions effectively to the subordinates to get the work done from them properly.

Communication Process

Communication is a perpetual process that essentially involves three factors which are: sender, message, and receiver. The factors involved in the communication process are:

1. Sender
The sender/communicator creates the message and sends it to the receiver. He is the source and the one who starts the communication.

2. Message
The message is the idea, information, view, fact, feeling, etc. that is created by the sender and is then intended to be communicated further.

3. Encoding
The message generated by the sender is encoded symbolically such as in the form of words, pictures, gestures, etc. before it is being communicated.

4. Media
It is the manner in which the encoded message is conveyed. The message may be conveyed orally or in writing. The medium of communication includes telephone, internet, post, fax, e-mail, etc. The choice of medium is decided by the sender.

5. Decoding
It is the means of transforming the symbols encoded by the sender. The message is received by the receiver after decoding.

6. Receiver
This person is last in the chain for whom the message is sent by the sender. Once the receiver receives the message and interprets it in the proper viewpoint and acts according to the message, then the purpose of communication is successful.

7. Feedback
Once the receiver confirms to the sender that he has received the message and understood it, the process of communication is complete.

8. Noise
It refers to any hindrance caused by the sender, message, or receiver during the process of communication. For example, poor telephone connection, defective encoding, weak decoding, unmindful receiver, weak understanding of message due to bias or improper gestures, etc.

Every communication involves (at least) one sender, a message, and a recipient. This may sound easy, but communication is actually a very tricky subject. The delivery of the message from sender to recipient can be influenced by a huge range of things. These include our sentiments, the social situation, the medium used to communicate, as well as our location.