The Evolution of Feminism

If there is one thing I’ve learned in life, it is the power of using your voice.

Michelle Obama

Feminism is not a new term it is the most controversial topic when you can get across to. Many believe this label has been a while for now but the fact is it has been there for years. Isn’t that fascinating?
There have been distinguished waves that served different purposes each time. It starts with the first wave which begins from 1848 to 1920. First-wave feminism is not the term used to describe the earliest feminist thinkers in history. It alludes to the suffragettes of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who led the first long-lasting political campaign in the West to bring about political justice for women. The first-wavers campaigned tenaciously for the right to vote for over 70 years, marching, lecturing, protesting, and being arrested, mocked, and subjected to violence. The Seneca Falls conference in 1848 serves as the primary starting point for the first wave. Nearly 200 women gathered at a went to the new church at that time to talk about “the social, civil, and religious position and privileges of women.” Following extensive discussion, the audience approved 12 resolutions advocating for particular equal rights, such as the opportunity to vote. The 19th Amendment was the first wave’s most significant piece of legislation. The movement as a whole started to fragment, despite specific groups continuing to struggle for abortion rights, equality in education and employment, and the right to vote for black women. It lost its unifying purpose and strong cultural impetus, and it wouldn’t find one again until the second wave started to gain speed in the 1960s.
The second wave from 1963 to 1980 started with Betty Friedan’s 1963 publication The Feminine Mystique. However, The Feminine Mystique was a trend. There were notable feminist theorists before Friedan who would later be linked to the second wave, most notably Simone de Beauvoir, whose Second Sex was published in France in 1949 and the US in 1953. In three years, 3 million copies were sold. The second wave aimed to provide women the ability to apply for mortgages and use their names to carry credit cards. It was successful in making marital rape illegal, raising awareness of domestic abuse, and constructing shelters for women escaping both rape and domestic violence. The legal efforts to define and prohibit workplace sexual harassment were successful.
The third wave has been existing since 1991 Third-wave feminism was completely different from second-wave feminism in terms of how it spoke and thought, but it also lacked the second-impressive wave’s cultural power. Since the third wave was a widespread movement without a clear objective, it lacks a single law or significant societal change comparable to the 19th wave.
The fourth wave is existing in the current period The third wave, unlike the 19th wave, did not result in single legislation or a fundamental shift in society since it was a broad movement without a specific goal. While most of the media’s coverage of #MeToo portrays it as a third-wave feminism-dominated movement, it appears to be based on a movement that lacks the third-wave’s distinctive dissemination. It has a distinct vibe. Even though the majority of media coverage of #MeToo portrays it as a third-wave feminism-dominated movement, it seems to be founded on a movement without the third-characteristic wave’s dispersion. It exudes a certain atmosphere. The most influential males in our culture are now being held responsible for their actions by the fourth wave. It has started a critical criticism of the power structures that enable predators to prey on women without consequence.