INDIAN MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

TYPES OF INDIAN MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS:

There are different types of musical instruments in India. Some of them are,

  • Sitar:

The word sitar is derived from the Persian word sehtar, meaning “three-stringed.” The sitar is a plucked stringed instrument, originating from the Indian subcontinent, used in Hindustani classical music. It has a long, broad, fretted neck and a gourd-shaped body. The sitar’s signature sound is produced by the string vibrating on a flat bridge with a gently curved surface.

  • Saraswati veena:

Veena represents the system of Indian music. Saraswati veena is one of the major types of veena today. The veena is played by sitting cross-legged with the instrument held tilted slightly away from the player. The word veena in India was a term originally used to generally denote “stringed instrument”, and included many variations that would be either plucked, bowed, or struck for sound.

  • Ghatam:

It is a clay pot with a narrow mouth. From the mouth, it slants outwards to form a ridge. Made mainly of clay backed with brass or copper filings with a small number of iron filings, the pitch of the ghatam varies according to its size.

  • Flute:

The flute is one of the most popular instruments in the band. The flute is a family of musical instruments in the woodwind group. The sound is created when the air is passed through the cavity and the holes in the flute. Over the history of the flute, the shape and size of the embouchure have been experimented with and changed from round to oval, oblong to square, big and small. The main 3 types of the flute are the standard, piccolo, and harmony flutes.

  • Tabla:

Tabla is a pair of small hand drums, one of which is slightly larger than the other, used in Indian classical music. The tabla is the most commonly played drum set in North Indian music. The tabla consists of two drums, the baya or the left drum, and the Dayan or the right drum, but the collective name for both the drums is tabla.

  • Mridangam:

The mridangam is a double-sided drum whose body is usually made using a hollowed piece of jackfruit wood about an inch thick. The two mouths or apertures of the drum are covered with a goatskin and laced to each other with leather straps around the circumference of the drum.

  • Nadaswaram:

The nadaswaram, nadhaswaram, nagaswaram, nagasvaram is a double-reed wind instrument from South India. It is used as a traditional classical instrument in Tamilnadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, and Kerala. The nadaswaram has seven finger-holes, and five additional holes drilled at the bottom which can be stopped with wax to modify the tone.

  • Tanpura:

The tanpura is a long-necked plucked string instrument. The electronic tanpura was invented in the late 19th century. It has a resonator and 4 strings, but no frets, as the notes are always played whole.

  • Jaltarangam:

It consists of a set of ceramic or metal bowls filled with water. The bowls are played by striking the edge with beaters, one in each hand. The instrument works on the principle of the motion of sound created or modified with the aid of water. When the edge of the bowl filled with water is stuck with wooden sticks it produces vibrations, that travel through the water and are transferred to the surrounding air to produce sweet melodic sounds.