Training Process

Every business, whether for profit or not, public or private, needs well-trained and experienced staff to carry out the operations necessary to meet the organization’s objectives.

Employees must be trained to improve their skill levels as well as their versatility and adaptability.

Inadequate work performance, productivity declines, changes resulting from job restructuring, or technological breakthroughs all necessitate some form of training and development.

Training Process in HRM – Steps, Process and Phases

A training is not a one-size-fits-all event; rather, it is a step-by-step procedure that can only be finished after all of the required tasks have been done successfully.

  1. Assessment of Training Needs
    Prior to training someone, it is evident that it is necessary to determine whether the individual requires training and, if so, what the instruction should accomplish. As a result, establishing what training is required is generally the first step in the training process. Whether you’re training new or existing staff will affect how you analyse training needs.

    The most important step in determining new employee training needs is to figure out what the work requires and split it down into subtasks, which you then teach to the new hires. Analysing existing employee demands can be more difficult because you also have to decide whether training is the best option.

    The training needs are analysed with the help of following types of analysis:

    The entire organisation is examined in terms of its goals, resources, resource allocation and utilisation, growth potential, and the environment in this analysis. The goal of this analysis is to establish where in the organisation training should be prioritised.

Under organisational analysis the following elements are studied:

(i)
Organisational Analysis:

(a) Analysis of Objectives and Strategies:
The entire organisation is examined in terms of its goals, resources, resource allocation and utilisation, growth potential, and the environment in this analysis. The goal of this analysis is to establish where in the organisation training should be prioritised.

(b) Resource Utilisation Analysis:
The major goal of this investigation is to see how organisational resources are used. This analysis looks at the contributions of several departments by generating efficiency indices for each unit, which aid in estimating the human resource contribution.

(c) Environmental Analysis:
This analysis looks at the organization’s economic, social, political, and technological surroundings. The major goal of this analysis is to determine the organization’s controllable and uncontrolled components.

(d) Organisational Climate Analysis:
The attitude of management and employees is examined in this analysis, as the support of management and their attitude toward employees is required for planning and implementing the training programme.

(ii) Role or Task Analysis:
It is a thorough assessment of all facets of the profession. It investigates the numerous operations as well as the conditions in which they are to be carried out.

Following procedure is involved in the task analysis:

(a) The duties and responsibilities of the task in question are listed using the job description as a guide.
(b) Creating a list of the job’s performance standards.
(c) Making a comparison between the actual and expected results.
(d) Identifying the components of the task that are causing problems in the effective performance of the job if there is a gap between the two.             
(e) Identifying the training requirements to address the issues.

(iii) Manpower Analysis:
The fundamental goal of this examination is to examine the individual’s abilities, skills, and growth and development. The manpower analysis aids in determining an individual’s strengths and shortcomings. It also aids in deciding whether or not he requires training. If that’s the case, what kind of instruction does he need?

The various sources of such information are as follows:

(a) Employee observation in the workplace.
(b) Conducting an interview with the employee’s boss and coworkers.
(c) The employee’s personal files.
(d) Tests and records of production. These sources will supply information on the employee’s current skills and attitude, which he should have.

2. Preparing the Training Programme:
The second step in the training process is to construct the training programme to suit these needs after determining the training needs.

The training programme should take into account the following considerations:

(i)New and experienced trainees
(ii) The kind of training materials that are needed
(iii) A person who will provide training as a resource
(iv) A training programme that is either on-the-job or off-the-job
(v) The length of the training programme
(vi) The training method.

3. Preparing the Learners:
The trainees who will participate in the training programme must be well-prepared for it. They will not be interested in learning the main components of the training programme if they are not prepared. As a result, learners should be adequately prepared so that they may get the most out of the training session.

Following steps are required for the preparation of learners for the training programme:

(i)Making the students feel at ease, especially if they are beginners, so that they are not frightened on the job.
(ii) Ensuring that the learners comprehend the relevance of the job and how it relates to the overall process.
(iii) Assisting learners in comprehending the training’s demands and objectives in respect to their jobs.
(iv) Creating interest in the training programme among learners to motivate them to learn.
(v) If on-the-job training is used, trainees should be placed as close to their employment as practicable.
(vi) Getting the students acquainted with the equipment, materials, and tools, among other things.

4. Implementing Training Programme:
This is the training program’s action phase. The trainer teaches and illustrates the new methods and knowledge to the learners during this phase. At this stage, the students are exposed to a variety of training exercises. To make the training a successful learning experience for the employees, the main topics are emphasised and one item is explained at a time.

To keep the learners’ attention in the training programme, audio-visual aids are employed to exhibit and illustrate, and the trainer encourages them to ask questions.

5. Performance Try Out:
The learner is asked to repeat the job multiple times, slowly, at this point. The trainees’ errors are addressed, and the technical and tough portions are explained again if necessary.

6. Evaluation of the Training Programme:
Training evaluation is an attempt to acquire information (feedback) on the impacts of a training programme and determine the training’s worth in light of that information. While organisations may spend a lot of money and time developing and implementing training programmes, the evaluation aspect is sometimes overlooked. This could be due to the assumption that determining the efficiency of training is difficult, if not impossible.

Only a comprehensive assessment of the real change in behaviour and performance on the job, over a long period of time, can determine the true success of training and development activities. As a result, the fundamental goal of training is to impart new knowledge, skills, and change in attitude and behaviour.

If training does not result in changes in any of these areas, it is completely useless. As a result, training is solely evaluated in terms of changes in skills, knowledge, attitude, and behaviour.











Under organisational analysis the following elements are studied:

(i)
Organisational Analysis: