Training Process

Every business, whether for profit or not, public or private, needs well-trained and experienced staff to carry out the operations necessary to meet the organization’s objectives.

Employees must be trained to improve their skill levels as well as their versatility and adaptability.

Inadequate work performance, productivity declines, changes resulting from job restructuring, or technological breakthroughs all necessitate some form of training and development.

Training Process in HRM – Steps, Process and Phases

A training is not a one-size-fits-all event; rather, it is a step-by-step procedure that can only be finished after all of the required tasks have been done successfully.

  1. Assessment of Training Needs
    Prior to training someone, it is evident that it is necessary to determine whether the individual requires training and, if so, what the instruction should accomplish. As a result, establishing what training is required is generally the first step in the training process. Whether you’re training new or existing staff will affect how you analyse training needs.

    The most important step in determining new employee training needs is to figure out what the work requires and split it down into subtasks, which you then teach to the new hires. Analysing existing employee demands can be more difficult because you also have to decide whether training is the best option.

    The training needs are analysed with the help of following types of analysis:

    The entire organisation is examined in terms of its goals, resources, resource allocation and utilisation, growth potential, and the environment in this analysis. The goal of this analysis is to establish where in the organisation training should be prioritised.

Under organisational analysis the following elements are studied:

(i)
Organisational Analysis:

(a) Analysis of Objectives and Strategies:
The entire organisation is examined in terms of its goals, resources, resource allocation and utilisation, growth potential, and the environment in this analysis. The goal of this analysis is to establish where in the organisation training should be prioritised.

(b) Resource Utilisation Analysis:
The major goal of this investigation is to see how organisational resources are used. This analysis looks at the contributions of several departments by generating efficiency indices for each unit, which aid in estimating the human resource contribution.

(c) Environmental Analysis:
This analysis looks at the organization’s economic, social, political, and technological surroundings. The major goal of this analysis is to determine the organization’s controllable and uncontrolled components.

(d) Organisational Climate Analysis:
The attitude of management and employees is examined in this analysis, as the support of management and their attitude toward employees is required for planning and implementing the training programme.

(ii) Role or Task Analysis:
It is a thorough assessment of all facets of the profession. It investigates the numerous operations as well as the conditions in which they are to be carried out.

Following procedure is involved in the task analysis:

(a) The duties and responsibilities of the task in question are listed using the job description as a guide.
(b) Creating a list of the job’s performance standards.
(c) Making a comparison between the actual and expected results.
(d) Identifying the components of the task that are causing problems in the effective performance of the job if there is a gap between the two.             
(e) Identifying the training requirements to address the issues.

(iii) Manpower Analysis:
The fundamental goal of this examination is to examine the individual’s abilities, skills, and growth and development. The manpower analysis aids in determining an individual’s strengths and shortcomings. It also aids in deciding whether or not he requires training. If that’s the case, what kind of instruction does he need?

The various sources of such information are as follows:

(a) Employee observation in the workplace.
(b) Conducting an interview with the employee’s boss and coworkers.
(c) The employee’s personal files.
(d) Tests and records of production. These sources will supply information on the employee’s current skills and attitude, which he should have.

2. Preparing the Training Programme:
The second step in the training process is to construct the training programme to suit these needs after determining the training needs.

The training programme should take into account the following considerations:

(i)New and experienced trainees
(ii) The kind of training materials that are needed
(iii) A person who will provide training as a resource
(iv) A training programme that is either on-the-job or off-the-job
(v) The length of the training programme
(vi) The training method.

3. Preparing the Learners:
The trainees who will participate in the training programme must be well-prepared for it. They will not be interested in learning the main components of the training programme if they are not prepared. As a result, learners should be adequately prepared so that they may get the most out of the training session.

Following steps are required for the preparation of learners for the training programme:

(i)Making the students feel at ease, especially if they are beginners, so that they are not frightened on the job.
(ii) Ensuring that the learners comprehend the relevance of the job and how it relates to the overall process.
(iii) Assisting learners in comprehending the training’s demands and objectives in respect to their jobs.
(iv) Creating interest in the training programme among learners to motivate them to learn.
(v) If on-the-job training is used, trainees should be placed as close to their employment as practicable.
(vi) Getting the students acquainted with the equipment, materials, and tools, among other things.

4. Implementing Training Programme:
This is the training program’s action phase. The trainer teaches and illustrates the new methods and knowledge to the learners during this phase. At this stage, the students are exposed to a variety of training exercises. To make the training a successful learning experience for the employees, the main topics are emphasised and one item is explained at a time.

To keep the learners’ attention in the training programme, audio-visual aids are employed to exhibit and illustrate, and the trainer encourages them to ask questions.

5. Performance Try Out:
The learner is asked to repeat the job multiple times, slowly, at this point. The trainees’ errors are addressed, and the technical and tough portions are explained again if necessary.

6. Evaluation of the Training Programme:
Training evaluation is an attempt to acquire information (feedback) on the impacts of a training programme and determine the training’s worth in light of that information. While organisations may spend a lot of money and time developing and implementing training programmes, the evaluation aspect is sometimes overlooked. This could be due to the assumption that determining the efficiency of training is difficult, if not impossible.

Only a comprehensive assessment of the real change in behaviour and performance on the job, over a long period of time, can determine the true success of training and development activities. As a result, the fundamental goal of training is to impart new knowledge, skills, and change in attitude and behaviour.

If training does not result in changes in any of these areas, it is completely useless. As a result, training is solely evaluated in terms of changes in skills, knowledge, attitude, and behaviour.











Under organisational analysis the following elements are studied:

(i)
Organisational Analysis:

Designing the Buyer Centric Funnel

In these industrial times, all the companies want to bait their customers, in fact for a much longer time than just one visit or purchase. This leads to continuous, relentless competition in the markets for the purpose of bagging more and more loyal customers. This is where the use of a Sales Funnel enters the talk. But is it possible to keep your customers devoted to your product without a well-designed, blockage-free funnel? The answer is ‘no’.  A sales funnel signifies the path which is taken by a customer from being just an explorer of your product to being a loyal customer for a long time. Through this article, we will go into depths of a customer’s psychology and get some insights on how to design a “buyer centric-funnel”.

Understanding the Funnel

The requirement of an effective method for better sales of a company’s product cannot be dismissed, keeping in view of the increase in a feud for loyal customers in the market. Also, with the coming up of e-commerce sites, grabbing a customer’s attention will be the predominant field to work upon, for the sellers. 

  1. Awareness- This is the key point that should be kept in mind while designing the funnel. Awareness does most of the work when it comes to putting the customer in a phase of scrutiny. To start with, we need to put forward a problem in front of the customer and provide a promising solution for the latter to build up the curiosity. At this stage, we wouldn’t mention our product to the customer.
  2. Consideration- Here, we need our customer to get so intimate with the product that he/she starts knowing about it like the back of his/her hand. We need to give out demos, free trials, triggers and customer stories to the customer to build up their trust in our firm because, to sell to a customer, you have to barge into the thought process of a customer.
  3. Purchase- Now you have to sell the product to your buyer and assure your product stands out from the products of all your competitors.
  1. Get into your buyer’s head- That’s where the whole concept of ‘Understanding the buyer’s psychology’ comes in. We need to ask ourselves questions like “What inspires them to buy our product?”, “How can our product be a solution to their problems?”, “How can we redesign our product to fit their needs?” and work on the answers to these questions.
  2. Slogans- Through close study, we come to a conclusion that firms with good slogans are doing better off in the market. The slogans and advertisements of these firms draw customers by getting stuck inside their brains.
  3.  Quality Maintenance- The quality of your product and extended benefits to loyal customers also gives your firm a new standing among the competitors. We also need to carefully appraise the field where our product fails to deliver and redesign it with wit.

Flipping the Sales Funnel refers to the process of retaining the loyal customers of the firm to gain new customers. Some firms in the market tend to forget its old customers in search of a bigger reach and new customers which lead to the degradation of the firm’s reputation in the market.

To gain ground, we need to build new customers on top of the old ones which can be done by referrals of the consumers to one another. Referral and reputation go and hand in hand. In fact, referrals are the leading intermediary stage for building a good reputation for the firm. According to a survey, 92% of people trust referrals from people they know.

We also need to adapt to the new rules of the market and focus more on redesigning products according to the wants of our targets for our technique to be successful. Rewarding the everlasting customers will be a plus point to this.

The design of a proper sales funnel is the most crucial part for the firm and should be done with patience and sheer determination through proper study and fact consideration, for the firm to leave its mark in this market race.

“The best sales questions have your expertise wrapped into them.”

-Jill Konrat

Importance of Scrutiny

The word “scrutiny” is derived from the Latin Manus, meaning “to happen”. Therefore, the management refers to the management of a particular business. It refers to the process of determining a specific, clear goals, and achieve them, by making best use of resources.

This will help the Group to achieve its Goals, the framing of factors of production, to collect and organize resources and to promote the effective integration of resources to achieve the goals . It will guide the group’s efforts to achieve pre-determined goals.

1. The Optimal use of resources:
Management to ensure the optimal use of resources, in order to prevent potential losses. This will help you make the best possible use of the resources within the limits set by your organization and its environment.

2. Effectively, leadership skills, and motivation:
In the absence of an institution or a business, the process is going to be random and non-systematic. The employees will feel more comfortable when they can see a group of people who are working day and night for the sake of the further development of the organization. The management of the group’s operations more efficient and effective. This will give the employees the opportunity to work together to achieve their aims in a coordinated manner.

3. Change and Growth are the following:
The activities of the group, is operating in a fast-paced environment with minimal supervision. Factors such as changes in technology, government policies, competition, etc.

4. In order to complete the objectives of:
The Precision of Contacts have hired people from Uttar Pradesh and gave it to them, not only work, but also in the homes, but also in memory, and their children, too. Employees, in turn, was a hard-working, and companies with high retention rates, and flexible labor force and gave them a competitive advantage.