Henna and its medicinal benefits.

The art of medicine consists in amusing the patient while nature cures the dieseases .

In East Asia countries henna has a prominent role in any celebration or occasion. It shows the richness of an east Asian culture with beautiful designs on hand. It’s scientifically termed Lawsonia Inermis.
Its earliest known usage was in Egypt around 1200 BC, when pharaohs’ hair and nails were dyed, as well as when they were being mummified. It was even rumored that Cleopatra personally decorated her body with henna.
The natural cooling action of henna, which gives skin a pleasant tingling feeling, maybe its most well-known feature (similar to chewing spearmint gum and drinking cold water). When this virtue was found, desert dwellers began using henna to keep their bodies cool. They created an air-conditioning effect by creating a henna paste and applying it to oneself. For as long as the henna stain lingers on the skin, the feeling is felt all over the body. The henna streaks were quickly transformed into works of art by the desert inhabitants. As a result, the tradition of henna emerged.
Coming to its benefits it has long been used medicinally, including as a poultice to treat burns and dermatitis and as a coagulant for open wounds. Ringworm and other microbial or fungal skin problems can be treated topically using fresh herbs. Henna’s benefits for heart health are among the least recognized. You can experience a hypotensive impact from henna water or seeds, which reduces stress on the cardiovascular system and significantly decreases blood pressure. Limiting the accumulation of plaque and platelets in the artery and cardiovascular can help prevent heart disease.
Moreover, henna has long been associated with bringing affection, wealth, and protection from wealth. It is true when one says the best medicine is usually what nature provides.