HOUSEPLANT/GARDENING

A houseplant is a plant that is grown indoors in places such as residences and offices, namely for decorative purposes, but studies have also shown them to have positive psychological effects. They also help indoor air purification, since some species, and the soil-dwelling microbes associated with them, reduce indoor air pollution by absorbing volatile organic compounds.While generally toxic to humans, such pollutants are absorbed by the plant and its soil-dwelling microbes without harm. Common houseplants are usually tropical or semi-tropical, succulents or cacti. Houseplants need to correct moisture, light levels, soil mixture, temperature and humidity. Without these conditions most house plants need to proper fertilizer and correct-sized pots.

Most species of houseplant will tolerate low humidity environments if they’re watered regularly. Different plants require different amounts of light, for different duration. Houseplants are generally grown in specialized soils called potting compost or potting soil.

Both under-watering and over-watering can be detrimental to a houseplant. Different species of houseplants require different soil moisture levels. Brown crispy tips on a plant’s leaves are a sign that the plant is under-watered. Yellowing leaves can show that the plant is over watered. Most plants can not withstand their roots sitting in water and will often lead to root rot. Most species of houseplant will tolerate low humidity environments if they’re watered regularly. Different plants require different amounts of light, for different duration. Houseplant are generally grown in specialized soils called potting compost or potting soil. A good potting compost mixture includes soil conditioners to provide the plant with nutrients, support, adequate drainage and proper aeration.

Houseplants are generally planted in pots that have drainage holes in the bottom of the pot to reduces the likelihood of over watering and standing water. A pot that is too large will cause root disease because of the excess moisture retained in the soil, while a pot that is too small will restrict a plant’s growth.

Psychological Effects

A 2015 study showed that active interaction with houseplants can reduce physiological and psychological stress compared with mental work. It appears that benefits are contingent on features of the context in which the indoor plant are encountered and on characteristics of the people encountering them. The phenomenon of biophilia explains why houseplants have positive psychological effects. Biophilia describes humans subconscious need for a connection with nature. This is why humans are fascinated by natural spectacles such as waves or a fire. It also explains why gardening and spending time outdoors can have healing effects. Having plants in indoor living areas can have positive effects on physiological, psychological and cognitive health.

Houseplant Care

Houseplant care is the act of growing houseplants and ensuring they have the necessary conditions for survival and continuing growth. This includes providing soil with sufficient nutrients, correct lighting conditions, air circulation and adding the right amount of water. Watering houseplants on a regular basis is necessary for the plant to remain healthy. They should not, however, be watered on a scheduled basis, because different plant species need different amounts of water and sunlight so it is important to know the specifics for the particular plants that are being grown.

Houseplants sometimes also need to be cleaned of dust and greasy films that collect on the leaves when they are indoors. Dusty, grimy leaves can inhibit growth.

Types of Houseplants

  • Pothos
  • Spider Plant
  • Peace Lily
  • Aloe vera
  • Rubber plant
  • English ivy
  • Jade plant
  • Bamboo palm