John Muir

-Aastha Joshi

John Muir

John Muir was also name as “John of mountains” or “Father of National park”. He was a Scottish American. He was a naturalist, author, environmental philosopher, botanist, zoologist, glaciologist, and early advocate for the preservation of wildness in the USA. His letters, essays, and books describing his adventures in nature, especially in the sierra Nevada, have been read by millions. His activism helped to preserve the Yosemite valley and Sequoia National Park. He was the co founder of Sierra-club which was a prominent America conservation organization. In his later life, Muir devoted most of his time to the preservation of the western forests. John Muir has been considered “an inspiration to both Scots and Americans”. Muir was appreciated for being an ecological thinker, political spokesman, and religious prophet, whose writings became a personal guide into nature for many people, making his name eternal in the modern environmental consciousness. On April 21, 2013, the first John Muir Day was celebrated in Scotland, which marked the 175th anniversary of his birth, paying homage to the conservationist. He lived on Dunbar, East Lithuania. Although he spent the majority of his life in America, he never forgot his roots in Scotland. He held a strong connection with his birthplace and Scottish identity throughout his life and was frequently heardtalking about his childhood in the East Lothian countryside. His strict and religious family has been seen as a reason for his love with nature. Muir soon became convinced that glaciers had sculpted many of the features of the Yosemite Valley and surrounding area. As Muir’s ideas spread, Whitney tried to discredit Muir by branding him as an amateur. But Louis Agassiz, the premier geologist, saw potential in Muir’s ideas and lauded him as “the first man I have ever found who has any adequate conception of glacial action.” During an accident where the tool he was using was slipped from his hand and stuck to his eyes, cutting the cornea in his right eye and then his left eye sympathetically failed. He was confined to a darkened room for six weeks to regain his sight, worried about whether he would end up blind. In his life, Muir published six volumes of writings, all describing explorations of natural settings. Four additional books were published. Muir’s friend, zoologist Henry Fairfield Osborn, writes that Muir’s style of writing did not come to him easily, but only with intense effort. He used to wale up early morning at 4:30am and practice his writing skills. He died on December 24 1914 in California, los Angeles