BOOK REVIEW-THE KITE RUNNER BY KHALED HOSSEINI

BY DAKSHITA NAITHANI

The Kite Runner is a remarkable and compelling novel that has become a cherished, yet another classic. It is a sweeping narrative of family, love, and friendship set against the terrible background of Afghanistan’s history during the previous three decades.

The Kite Runner is a riveting and dramatic narrative of treachery and redemption that left the readers both excited and touched. It depicts the narrative of Amir and Hassan, two best friends who are also specialists in the art of kite flying and are as close as brothers. The two young boys reside in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan and this year they’ll try harder than ever before to win the local kite-fighting championship, a traditional Afghan pastime—which is Amir’s last hope of regaining his father’s affection. But, like the kites fighting in the skies, conflict descends on Afghanistan, turning the nation into a deadly region.

In this work, the kite was utilised as a metaphor. Amir wants to please his father by winning the game, while Hassan demonstrates his naive allegiance by being a kite runner, in the early stages of the storey. Khaled Hosseini’s words are quite solemn, like as Hassan’s dialogue “For you, a thousand times over” when Amir replied “Hassan, come back with the kite.” It expresses Hassan’s earnest commitment to their friendship. Baba is a hero to his son, treating his servant’s son as if he were his own. Amir attempts to amaze him for the most part and becomes exhausted, but Hassan makes it look easy As a result, he despises Hassan for that reason alone. “There is just one sin, only one,” Baba said of lying. That is thievery. Theft is the root of all other sins. When you kill a guy, you take away a life… you take away his wife’s right to a husband, and you take away his children’s right to a father. When you tell a falsehood, you are robbing someone of their right to know the truth. Cheating robs you of your right to justice… there is no more heinous conduct than stealing.” In the second part of the storey, he develops into an irony.

People are frequently compelled to make enormous sacrifices in battle, and the young Amir himself commits a treachery, directed at his best mate Hassan, that will plague him for the rest of his life. When Amir and his father are forced to escape Afghanistan for America, The Kite Runner has become the narrative of Amir’s search for atonement, as he seeks to atone for the wrongs he did as a child in Kabul.

The tale is fast-paced and never dull, and it brings us to a weird, intriguing, yet oddly familiar world, the world of Afghan life. Not only is the storey itself brilliantly constructed, but the book also explores the very art of storytelling. Hosseini’s writing strikes a great balance between being clear and yet powerful, and not only is the story itself brilliantly constructed, but the book also explores the very art of storytelling. Amir becomes a writer himself, and he reflects on his experiences in the tale as if his lifetime were a work of fiction.

The kite runner’s finest feature is its feeling of fate and justice, of virtue triumphing over bad in the end, despite all obstacles. Without giving anything away about the plot, Amir returns to Afghanistan and undertakes a new series of sacrifices in order to put things right. The message underlying the finale might be taken differently by various readers, but it gives a glimmer of hope for the characters’ futures, as well as possibly for war-torn Afghanistan.

Khaled Hosseini writes with a heart that recalls, and remembers well, his motherland. Though most of us think of Afghanistan as war-torn and exhausted, obsessive and confining, even terrifying, Hosseini recalls what it was like before all of that. He provides the Afghan community a face, which has the potential to be quite strong.

He doesn’t offer us a narrator that is pleasant, admirable, or even excusable, but he does give us a narrator who is real, fragile, and suffers as a result of his flaws. There is no atonement for certain sins, just pardon.

book review: A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini-review

A Thousand Splendid Suns, with one goal in my mind: I wanted to have a real cry. One of those books that truly move you, pulling on your heartstrings until you bawl like a child. The main plot seemed to fill my criteria. Set in Afghanistan from the 1960s to the 1990s, spanning from Soviet occupation to the Taliban control, following the lives of two women in their marriages and in their war-torn country. Expecting domestic abuse, graphic war descriptions and a main theme of oppression in Afghan women, I was satisfied- yes, I will weep.

The novel is split in a dual narrative, the first being Mariam when she is nine, living on the outskirts of Heart with her bitter mother, anxiously in wait for the once-a-week visits from her wealthy father. Branded a harami, an illegitimate child, Mariam faces many prejudices and blame not only from the family of her father, but also from her own mother. Hosseini introduces a naïve child whom you immediately pity, and also feel a foreboding clutch the pages. Not soon into the story, Mariam discovers the emptiness in her father’s love and after her mother’s suicide, is forced to marry a man more than 20 years her senior, her being only 15.

You blink several times. You squirm. You cry out in outrage. But Hosseini isn’t finished. Rasheed is a kind man, albeit rather archaic in his manner and grumpy, but all things considered Mariam’s life does not seem so terrible anymore. Until the miscarriage. And then the continual miscarriages. Domestic abuse? Yup, I knew there must be some somewhere.

However, Hosseini does something new. You pity the husband, for his past is one with sorrow much like Mariam’s- it does not justify his actions- but you feel sympathy for his situation. Then comes the second narrative- Laila. An innocent young child with a best friend who is a boy, a family torn by the war that steals her brothers away from her and in turn her mother’s affection. Orphaned, torn from her love, Laila agrees to marry Rasheed. The stories of these two wives will make you gaze in awe at the sheer strength of love in desperate times.

All the way through the novel Hosseini weaves in information about Afghanistan’s situation nevertheless it is only here that it takes a role in the story. Yet he makes sure that it is never a driving force in the novel- that is for the voices of these two women. Both trying to make do, muddling through life trying to find joy through the gloom, one innocent yet hiding a terrible secret and another bitter with age and resenting her life. Both still with a glimmer of hope in their eyes as they embark on a great journey.

Hosseini’s writing is simple, and that is all it needs to be, a welcoming contrast to Mariam and Laila’s complex situations.

By the end you are not only left with a tear, but with a fire lit within. It is above all a story of hope and of life, the heroism that comes with love and the inevitable strife that comes with living. Inspirational, outstanding, every man and women must read this tale.