Sardar Bhagat Singh – THE LEGEND

89 years ago, one of India’s greatest revolutionary freedom fighters, Bhagat Singh, was given the death penalty by the British colonisers. And though he died young, only 23 years of age, his actions inspired the youth of the nation to fight for the nation’s freedom. His execution spurred many to take up the revolutionary path, playing an important role in India’s freedom struggle.

Bhagat Singh was born on 28 September 1907. He was also known as Shaheed-e-Azam Bhagat Singh. He is one of the youngest freedom fighters who was hanged at a young age. In this article, we are presenting some unknown facts about Bhagat Singh and his revolutionary life which not only inspires but also influences others. Bhagat Singh is considered one of the most powerful revolutionaries of Indian Independence movement. He inspired thousands to take up the cause of the freedom movement.  He was a brave freedom fighter. His feelings of patriotism were not only restricted against British rule but also towards the division of India on communal lines. He was genius, mature, and always attracted to socialism. 

He was attracted to anarchist and Marxist ideologies which further bring revolutionary ideas to his mind. He was a bright student, a reader, and always actively participated in extra-curricular activities.

He was born on 28 September, 1907 in Punjab, India (now Pakistan), to a Sikh family. He was involved with several revolutionary organizations and set an example of patriotism in the country.

He quit school at thirteen to devote his life to Indian Independence and died at a very young age of 23. Popularly he is known as Shaheed-e-Azam Bhagat Singh. He was found guilty of killing a British police officer and hanged on March 23, 1931. Here, we are presenting some inspiring and unknown facts about Bhagat Singh.

Here’s what you should know about him!

Bhagat Singh left home for Kanpur when his parents tried to get him married, saying that if he married in slave India, “my bride shall only be death” and joined Hindustan Socialist Republican Association.

He along with Sukhdev planned to avenge the death of Lala Lajpat Rai and plotted to kill the Superintendent of Police James Scott in Lahore. However, in a case of mistaken identity, John Saunders, the Assistant Superintendent of Police was shot.

Although a Sikh by birth, he shaved his beard and cut his hair to avoid being recognised and arrested for the killing. He managed to escape from Lahore to Calcutta.

national college lahore, bhagat singh 4th from right

A year later, he and Batukeshwar Dutt threw bombs in the Central Assembly Hall in Delhi, and shouted “Inquilab Zindabad!” He did not resist his arrest at this point.

During interrogation, the British came to know about his involvement in the death of John Saunders a year earlier.

At the time of his trial, he didn’t offer any defence, rather used the occasion to propagate the idea of India’s freedom.

Bhagat Singh was so much disturbed by the Jallianwala Bagh massacre that he bunked the school to visit the site of the bloodbath. In college, he was a great actor and played several roles in plays like ‘Rana Pratap’ and ‘Bharat-Durdasha’.

hagat Singh in his childhood always spoke about guns. He wanted to grow guns in the fields using which he can fight with the British. When he was 8 years old, instead of talking about toys or games he always speaks about driving out British from India.

Bhagat Singh had told the British that “instead of hanging they should shoot him” but the British did not consider it. He mentioned this in his last letter. Bhagat Singh wrote in this letter, “Since I was arrested during the war. Therefore, I cannot be punished for hanging. Let me be thrown into the mouth of a cannon. “This shows his braveness and the feeling for the nation.

Bhagat Singh coined a powerful slogan ‘Inquilab Zindabad’ which became the slogan of India’s armed struggle.

He was hanged an hour ahead of the official time on March 23, 1931. It is said that Bhagat Singh was smiling when he was hanged. In fact, this was done with a fearlessness to “lowered British imperialism”. 

When his mother had come to visit him in jail, Bhagat Singh was laughing loudly. Seeing this, the jail officials were shocked to see how this person is who is laughing openly despite being so close to death.

His legacy will continue to live in the hearts of many.

“They may kill me, but they cannot kill my ideas. They can crush my body, but they will not be able to crush my spirit” 

Shaheed Bhagat SIngh

“Nationalism, Colonialism and Indian English Literature” – P. P. Raveendran

P. P. Raveendran’s article “Nationalism, Colonialism and Indian English Literature” attempts to study how a nation is constructed by the writer through their works. The essayist describes nationalism as an ‘awakening of a nation to self-consciousness’. It differs from the colonial forms of domination and he states that English literature appeared as a subject in the curriculum of the colonies before it was institutionalized in its home country. The emergence of Indian English Literature was an Indian response to both nationalism and national movement. Some writers used English for writing because of the universal acceptance of this language; so that their works would reach more hands. Others wanted to prove their proficiency in English through their works. They indirectly state that they can stand before everyone even though once they are considered uncivilized.


P. P. Raveendran talks about the evolution of Indian English Literature by tracing its history. The first book written by an Indian in English was “Travels of Dean Mahomet”, a travel narrative by Sake Dean Mahomet published in English in 1793. He tries to compare the writings of early Indian writers with modern writings. Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay wrote “Rajmohan’s Wife” and published it within the year 1864. It is the primary Indian novel written in English. Rajaram, an Indian philosopher, and writer authored “Kanthapura” and “The Serpent and The Rope”, which are Indian in terms of their storytelling qualities. Kisari Mohan Ganguli translated “The Mahabharata” into English. Rabindranath Tagore wrote in Bengali and English and translated his own works into English. He gives the examples and writing styles of some of the Indian English writers like R.K. Narayan, Mulk Raj Anand, Raja Rao, Kiran Desai, V.S. Naipaul, etc. He also compares Sarojini Naidu’s poem with Kamala Das’s poem and says that Naidu’s is highly ‘orientalized’.

The importance of history

We from our childhood are given a name, we as we study along and get educated, we collect certificates, participate in competitions, compete for rank, give speeches , excel in sports and exams, and so on, all this time we are creating an unique identity. Every step of our life we are contributing to make our own unique identity, trying to be something different, trying to mark our mark, trying to create a legacy, each and everyone’s different in its own way. From the laziest to the most energetic, form the dorkiest to the smartest, from the strongest to the most disciplined, from a Romeo to any geek, from a child to a teen to a young grown up to a middle aged person to a old man, that is what everyone strives for subconsciously. 


What is history ?

History is what we came from and is often why we think and act in a certain way.We will frame our very lives in the paths travelled by our relatives and their actions. As the saying goes, “ to understand what is, one must understand what was”.

What history has is the goal of tracing narratives of past events, and analyzing the patterns that emerge as a way to provide perspective on our past.

History is wonderful and should be studied and therefore understood.

It can be studied at different levels and is just full of great adventures.

– food – countries – trains – religion – art – medicine – architecture – fashion.


Why is history important? 

The same reason that personal memory matters. If you didn’t know what you had done in the past, he would have no meaningful identity as a person. History is to civilization what memory is to individuals.

Aa there is a saying which goes as :

History repeats itself. Who knows, what we learn right now about the past may come back to help us in the future!

In all cases, understanding History is integral to a good understanding of the condition of being human. That allows people to build, and, as may well be necessary, also to change, upon a secure foundation. Neither of these options can be undertaken well without understanding the context and starting points. All living people live in the here-and-now but it took a long unfolding history to get everything to NOW. And that history is located in time-space, which holds this cosmos together, and which frames both the past and the present.

Well, the truth of the matter is that history does repeat itself and it’s best to be prepared for it by knowing the outcomes of previous instances and being able to make educated decisions based off of these that will help to a greater degree in the long run.

It helps us solve whatever problems the future holds. So keep knowing about the history or the past before stepping to anything


Perspective towards the history

There are many different perspectives that explain History’s existence.

History is older than any other form of ‘social study’ and existed way before there were academic institutions or an academic discipline associated to it. So, it seems it has been a social and cultural demand of various cultures (but not all of them), to understand their own selves in time. The narratives of origin gave a special meaning to particular groups and cultures. Something akin to mythological narratives, but with a claim to represent ‘what really happened’, based on testimonies and observations and making sense of where we came from. So, we come to a perspective very widespread in ancient times, that of History as a ‘master of life’, a repository of experiences and deeds of great (and lesser) men, which could be used by those who read it (statesmen, generals, etc.) in order to learn from the mistakes and great achievements, morals and virtues of generations past. The past as a guide to future action.

Another perspective came with the need, analogous to the new modern sciences, of understanding the world in an objective scientific perspective. Because of the historical context in which that process happened i.e coinciding with the birth and consolidation of the modern nation-state, it was closely linked with the political, philosophical and ideological need to construct national identities, referred to historical narratives of national origins. The understanding of the past as scientific knowledge, not necessarily for any practical purpose. Later, History came to be seen, through another political and epistemological perspective, as a tool to understand the present, by means of understanding and explaining how political, social, economic and cultural processes evolved, from different past configurations. The study of the past as a method to understand the present.


Should history matter to us

Even if there is no true objectivity to one’s history, even if there is no real common interpretation of history, but the truth is we need to protect it for our relative objectivity and subjectivity both. At Least for this day in age of 21st century, ask not what is reality, ask how to protect our reality because once our reality is distorted either by lie or truth, identity is lost. 

History makes future for us at the end of the day, what one did yesterday decides what happens today. What we do today, when today becomes yesterday, our those actions make the future. History is our child. We are creating history as we are living through the present. It is our legacy, it is our tomorrow’s myth and legend, history is us from once.  


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