Can Video Games be beneficial for Education?

In parallel to their entertainment factor, video games have tremendous promising aspects and there has been significant progress when games are

Designed to tackle a particular problem or teach some skill. Video games have grown and developed, and so has our society. Graphics got prettier, stories got richer and more involved. We have slowly got to recognize the true potential for learning and enriching ourselves in virtual worlds. We have also seen the appearance of “Gamification” in many industry sectors with the growth of the video game market; education is at the forefront of this.

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Why it is that such a massive industry cannot be used to make the world better? Video games are the bread and butter of recreation for kids. It’s a pastime that incentivizes teamwork, communication skills and also a depth of information depending on the content. We’ve begun to realize that just as people enjoy books and movies and physical media, people also enjoy gambling. And they can use it for more than just discovering fantasy worlds and destroying castles. The core Language skills are a typical example of the educational value video games provide.

This research project of the ESL classroom by the Kanda University of International Studies produced by Jared R. Baierschmidt has a wealth of knowledge on the topic of gaming-learning. Baierschmidt generated and implemented a unique English as a Second Language course with a focus on gaming. He writes that In terms of the activities themselves, approximately 39 percent of respondents found the multiplayer cooperative activity to be most useful for their studies. The stated reasons included the fact that during the activity, the educators were able to use a variety of language skills and the activity encouraged them to actively communicate with their partner.

This means that collaborative, competitive games through meaning, play, and human relationships can help students learn English as a second language. Baierschmidt also writes that according to polls, around 90 % of respondents plan to continue using digital games for language learning even after the [ESL] course has been completed. While researching how gaming helps people learn a second language is still so fresh, this work is a big step in the right direction when it comes to understanding the effect and intersection between playing. It turns out that breaking down activities into challenges and awarding accomplishments (just as video games do) is a smart idea.

Cosmetics, tools to create their own games, and a lot of competition and motivation from the staff and facility all act as opportunities for successful work. By motivating students to see failure as an opportunity to improve, they excel rather than as a sign of something lacking in the student. It’s this idea of failure is just a loss, not a catastrophe, which helps children to succeed and really enjoy learning and developing, just as a character in a video game is progressing on their path. There seems to be a dominant view that education isn’t congruent with fun, and when placed in the same realm as learning, happiness should take a back seat. But why?

Education should be able to educate, direct and nurture young people as effectively as possible, even if it means changing the system. Even on the side-lines, video games can still provide excellent educational opportunities. We need to teach kids how to learn in order to drive education forward. And learning by play is a great way to get children interested in awareness, their future, and scholastic subjects.