Favouritism in Schools

The children consider their schools their second home and teachers to be regarded to be part of the next parenting phase. We eloquently believe the phase of schooling tries to teach us many essential things. We come across various subjects and information, fitness, grooming, contact, principles and other characteristics important to live a productive life. In essence, teachers encourage students to face hurdles and tackle any situation in life. Although they teach us all of these values, there is one aspect unknowingly practiced by some schools — prejudice and preferential treatment to some students as teachers have their favourites.

A fortunate few students—those sweet, intelligent, smart, and well-behaved ones—are accustomed to their teachers’ wide smiles and open praises. Yet it’s a half-hearted greeting for some, just barely a glimpse. When asked, teachers will never confess to playing games except to themselves. While plainly obvious to students to see, teachers still conceal favouritism beneath a cloak of justifications such as “I don’t play favourites,” and “I just admire those of positive behaviour, so that others can imitate.”

5 Reasons Why Teachers Shouldn't Play Favourites | The Teachers Digest

Have we not learnt in educational institutions that everyone is equivalent and that everyone should be treated the same way? But the worldview is not sometimes taken up in the classroom. Some teachers pay extra attention and consideration to those students they admire, so they don’t want to acknowledge certain students or cultivate their natural abilities. Most students love to take part in contests, shows, etc., but teachers repetitively select students who are excellent and confident to win, after all, winning is a prestige issue. They fail to provide other so-called ‘ordinary’ students an opportunity to interact, communicate or highlight their secret talents. Every teachers must be aware that each and every student deserves a chance and should be assessed without any favouritism. Students may not win and may fail but they should be motivated by a teacher to try and help them try again until they excel.

You can train and mentor the not-so-brilliant students to take their performance results to the next level. It will take persistence and time but a satisfying path to see a student succeed would be the speed of progress. While passively passing comments and elevating smart students will demoralize other students, which will lower their self-esteem and denying them the incentive to do better.

Favouritism can lead somebody to question their capabilities and relevance. If somebody starts feeling inferior, he or she might begin to doubt his or her self-worth. Often picking the clever ones is never a positive deed and if they just put their sights on the fast learners, then can a instructor pull out the best from other pupils. Teachers should seek to comprehend each student, rather than just favour a few, and help them further. The extreme bias of teachers is one of the main reason why some students cook up some excuse not to go to school or to leave the school.

If teachers are open-minded, acknowledge and respect the views of their students, the students would be better off. It is natural that teachers should be attracted towards certain pupils, but a teacher must be smart enough to understand those feelings and be clever and patient enough not to reveal their interests to any student in some particular way. As long as a teacher has strong communication skills in the classroom giving priority to each student, no harm is done. The educational objective is to bring out the best in each student. Although it is not as straightforward as it appears at first, teachers must listen to the needs of all their students. After all, instructors are seen as the second parent; affection and attention of parents must be equally distributed among their children — regardless of the child’s characteristics.

Teachers are the truly revolutionary catalyst. It will help to mold a productive, effective and efficient person by treating students fairly and constantly to boost their confidence. Educating children is a teacher’s role: make sure you do it right.