What Is a Staffing Agency?

Looking for work can be a full-time job, from networking and researching job postings to writing resumes and cover letters to interviewing and following up with hiring managers. But, what is a staffing agency, and exactly what does one do for job seekers?

Temporary staffing provides you the human resources you need for a specified period. However, the employees continue to be on our payroll, and they work for you. We will take care of the rest like identifying the kind of employees you need and going through the hiring formalities and documentation. All you need to do is let them work for you. Once their job or requirement is over, you inform us, and we will take care of their exit. It is as simple as that.

A staffing agency — also known as a search, recruiting or staffing firm or service — is an organization that matches companies and job candidates. By registering with a staffing agency, you have the potential to make connections with multiple hiring managers looking to find the right people for their job openings. You can save time and find opportunities you may not be able to find on your own.

So how do staffing agencies work, and how can they help you achieve your employment goals? Here are eight tips for job seekers on what you need to do, what you can expect and how you can get the most out of a relationship with a staffing agency.

1. Choose the right specialized staffing agency

Not every staffing agency is the same. Before investing in the relationship, spend some time learning about them. Make sure it’s equipped to help someone with your career profile and professional goals. Also find out if it is a general staffing firm or one that targets specific industries. At Robert Half, the world’s largest specialized staffing firm, we offer you many opportunities in several fields.

Will you have fees to pay if you get placed in a position? That depends on the staffing agency. Robert Half, for instance, never charges fees to represent you as a job candidate.

2. Get registered with the agency

At most staffing agencies, you’ll begin by submitting your resume and a cover letter. Once the agency reviews and accepts these documents, you may be asked to take part in skills testing and an interview with one of their recruitment experts so they can learn more about you. Then they can help you improve your resume, prep you for interviews and share local hiring trends.

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3. Treat the interview seriously

Approach the interview with a staffing manager just as you would any job interview with an employer. The goal of the staffing agency is not to grill you, but to get a good sense of the opportunities that best suit you.

Even if you’re connecting remotely, make sure you’re well-dressed, well-groomed and well-prepared. You should be ready to talk about your employment experience, work habits, career objectives and workplace culture preferences. If the staffing agency is considering you for a position at a specific company, do some research on the business so you can ask relevant questions.

4. Decide if you want temporary or full-time work

Employers often turn to staffing agencies to find candidates for temporary or project-based work. Others are looking to hire full-time employees. In addition, there is a growing trend toward temporary-to-full-time positions. For many people, this can be the best of both worlds, giving both the employer and candidate a chance to get to know each other before making a longer-term commitment.

Clarify whether you want short-term, long-term, or temporary-to-permanent employment. This will help all parties — you, the recruiter and the hiring company.

5. Let the job search begin

After your interview, the recruiters will be equipped to represent you with more than your resume. They’ll have a full picture of your hard skills, soft skills (especially communication skills), short-term employment objectives and long-term career goals.

So far, the process sounds a lot like applying for a job — and it is. But once the agency has determined you’re a viable candidate for placement, it will leverage its contacts at companies in your industry and search for open positions that correspond with your qualifications and preferences. Well-connected recruiters often have deep industry contacts and knowledge of unadvertised job openings.

6. Keep making yourself marketable

The best staffing firms offer a plethora of professional development and training opportunities, so take advantage of them while you’re waiting to hear back. It’s a great way to improve your employment prospects and distinguish yourself to potential employers. Robert Half, for example, has more than 8,000 courses and online reference materials, as well as access to free continuing professional education and program credits.

7. Respond as quickly as possible

If your agency contacts you about an open position, don’t wait to reply. Many jobs need to be staffed ASAP, and you don’t want to miss out on a good opportunity. Once your recruiter finds a potential match, they will typically arrange an interview for you with their client to determine whether it’s a good fit.

Some staffing agencies will help negotiate pay and other terms of the engagement on your behalf. They may even take care of all the associated paperwork for you, so all you have to do is show up at your new gig.

8. Stay engaged with your recruiter

If you aren’t getting any interviews, ask your agency representative what you can do to improve your chances. On the other hand, if you’ve been successful in garnering interviews on your own, keep your recruiter informed. The staffing agency may have contacts at the company who could help you land the role.

It’s important for you to stay on top of the job search process and keep in regular contact with your recruiters. While the agency will notify you when a potential job becomes available, it’s acceptable to check in with your recruiter once every week or two.

A temporary staff can lead to cost savings and enhanced productivity for your organization. One of the leading temporary agencies, Staffing Agency Monroe LA combines innovative technology with the human touch to save costs, enhance quality, and maximize efficiency for your business. Embrace flexibility and business freedom with our excellent contract staffing services.

We cover temporary staffing, permanent placements and specialties (dedicated units focusing on specific market segments). Our staffing services are offered through our well-known network of branches. We deploy a unique unit structure in many countries, where each unit consists of two consultants who are responsible for both client service and candidate selection. 

Our consultants are experts in the local labor market, and work with you to understand your business and your needs. They use the latest technologies to source talent and put their people skills to good use to ensure the right talent comes to you. This is how we support you in taking your business forward. 

Retail, Hospitality, and Telecom were some of the leading sectors that employed temporary staff. Now, this bug has bitten the juiciest apple, the IT sector. Temporary staffing is not limited to junior level but has touched senior level employees too.

  • Looking for a way to reduce your administrative costs and liabilities associated with permanent employees?
  • Looking to migrate employees from existing company rolls?
  • Do you need human resources on a flexible period basis that can add to your margins, profits, and bottom line?
  • Do you need human resources for particular positions or in groups?
  • Talks to us and let TalentPro surprise you as to how temporary staffing can impact your business and finances directly.

Finding qualified talent remains challenging for many small companies. Reviewing applications, interviewing candidates and negotiating salaries all take precious time away from a business owner’s existing obligations, which may end up hurting the business in the long run. That’s why some employers partner with staffing agencies, which take a lot of the time and effort out of the search for candidates by providing their own workers for open roles.

How much does a staffing agency charge?

Staffing agencies typically charge 25% to 100% of the hired employee’s wages. So, for example, if you and the staffing agency have agreed on a markup of 50%, and the new employee earns an hourly wage of $10, you will pay the agency $15 per hour for their work.

In addition to the markup you will pay, you may be expected to cover additional fees for filling the position or a contract buyout fees, if you hire a temporary worker permanently.

Top Recruiting Softwares to Use

Recruiting software is a category of human resources management (HRM) that handles the process of posting jobs and attracting top talent for vacant positions within a company. From posting jobs to reviewing resumes and interviewing candidates, recruiting software streamlines the entire candidate search and hiring process, automating when possible to lessen workloads. By eliminating paperwork and offering powerful resume and candidate search functions, the software makes it easier for organizations to find and hire employees.

Recruiting software are equipped with the tools to attract, engage, hire, and retain the talent that drives success. Looking for a complete recruiting solution? Read this full article to learn more.

Top Recruiting Softwares to Use

What Is Recruiting Software?

Recruiting software is software that helps organizations optimize the hiring process, from finding and attracting candidates to screening resumes and sending out offer letters. Recruiting software is often called an applicant tracking system or ATS, though these two are not exactly the same. Recruiting software is a broader category that encompasses applicant tracking systems as well as other tools that focus on individual phases of the hiring process.

What Is CRM Recruiting?

CRM (candidate relationship management) recruiting uses another type of recruiting software similar to an ATS. However, while an ATS manages applications for any given job, a CRM is a tool for nurturing relationships with potential job candidates. In other words, an ATS is more focused on active job applicants, while a CRM is used to build a pool of talent eligible for future job openings.

Functions of Recruiting Software

Most recruiting software can do some or all of the following:

  • Sourcing: Sourcing helps recruiters find and attract candidates; it can be especially valuable for identifying passive candidates who may not otherwise see an organization’s job ads.
  • Engagement: Candidate engagement functions help streamline communication between recruiters and candidates to keep candidates engaged and informed throughout the hiring process, which in turn can improve an organization’s hiring rate.
  • Selection: Screening and selection capabilities can help speed up the process of choosing qualified candidates from among a pool of applicants. This kind of software may offer features such as artificial intelligence screening, assessments and evaluations, central collaboration for hiring managers, and more.
  • Hiring: Finally, some organizations may use recruiting software that manages the actual step of hiring and bridges the gap between candidate experience and employee experience. Some of these platforms may even dip into elements of onboarding to make the transition as smooth as possible for new employees exiting the hiring funnel.

How Does Recruitment Software Work?

Typical recruitment software tracks applicants throughout the screening and interview process. For example, hiring managers and recruiters will be able to create a job posting, send it out to the appropriate platforms, and view all relevant job applications through the recruitment software portal. Updates can be made in the portal once the candidates have been interviewed. The recruitment software can also be used to send out job offers, handle paperwork related to onboarding the new employee, and create reports relating to the hiring process. This makes the entire process more efficient and organized, giving everyone involved more time to handle other tasks.

Benefits of Using Recruiting Software

As we said, organizations use recruiting software to optimize the hiring process. This optimization can improve the hiring experience for both recruiters and candidates alike.

For hiring organizations, recruiting software can make the hiring process faster and more efficient. Not only does this save managers and recruiters time, but it also makes it easier for an organization to hire top candidates who may be weighing multiple offers.

For candidates, recruiting software can simplify the application process and open up communication channels, both of which contribute to a positive candidate experience. And when candidates have a positive experience with an organization’s hiring process, regardless of the outcome, they are more likely to endorse the company to  their friends and family or even apply again themselves.

Top Job Aggregators

Job boards and job aggregators are central to the recruiting ecosystem because direct applicants make up 48% of all hires.

  1. Indeed, with its database, is the biggest source of external hires by far. In 2020, it was credited with an incredible 75% of all job applications and 47% of all hires in the US
  2. LinkedIn, primarily known for its professional social networking platform, connecting professionals globally, also provides a Job Search Tool allowing users to find job opportunities. These opportunities are based on location, industry, and recommendations based on your employment profile on LinkedIn. 
  3. Google For Jobs, designed to be a direct competitor to Indeed, may prove to be a game-changer. It recently added four new features: accessing salary information, applying location filters, bookmarking saved jobs, and selecting which job board applicants job seekers want to use to apply.
  4. ZipRecruiter, with over 25 million job seekers a month visiting the site, became a popular choice for employers as well as job seekers because it posts job listings to multiple job boards, as opposed to just one

Top Recruitment CRMs

With the rise of recruitment marketing, candidate relationship management (CRM) software has become central for attracting, engaging, and nurturing candidates.

  1. Yello, with features that include, schedule automation, video interviewing, employee referrals, and integrations with ATSs and HRISs, has a talent acquisition platform that provides a variety of recruiting solutions. 
  2. Beamery,  the London-based startup, ranked 10th fastest growing company in the UK in the 2020 Deloitte Technology Fast 50. It offers self-styled recruitment marketing software targeted at fast-growing companies.
  3. Avature, founded by Dimitri Boylan, co-founder and former CEO of HotJobs.com, Avature is a highly flexible enterprise SaaS platform for Global Talent Acquisition. Avature has over 650 customers of which 110 are Fortune 500 organizations.

Top Testing & Assessment Tools

The use of pre-hire assessments to test the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other qualifications are on the rise. Surveys show that more than 80% of Fortune 500 companies are using pre-hire assessments.

  1. Criteria Corp, a pre-assessment tool that seamlessly integrates with current ATS and HRIS processes provides a variety of assessments to measure candidates across a variety of dimensions, such as cognitive aptitude, personality, emotional intelligence, etc. 
  2. Berke Assessment, founded in 2004, creates tests that help employers predict job behaviours such as teamwork, communication, customer service, and problem-solving. 
  3. HackerRank, creates coding and technical assessments to help recruiters assess the skills of developers and software engineers. It also offers an online interviewing tool.
  4. Traitify, with more than 200 current customers provides an image-based, mobile-first personality assessment. Traitify’s assessments are quick and effective taking an average of only 90 seconds to complete with a completion rate of 90% or higher.
  5. SHL, providing science-based assessments, along with expert training and consulting for the last 40 years, was awarded the 2020 HR Tech Award for Best Innovative Tech Solution for their Virtual Assessment and Development Center

What is Employment Screening and How to Do Employment Screening

Employment screening enables you to verify the skills, experience and qualifications of a candidate to assist you in making your hiring and recruitment decisions. This provides you with all of the available information about a candidate to make the most accurate decision and safeguard your hiring process. Employment screening also helps to protect your company’s reputation and ensure that your financial and people risk is minimised.

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Many employers will conduct pre-employment screenings before they send you a job offer. Potential employers will typically perform a screening sometime during the interview process to assist in their hiring decision. There are a variety of screenings potential employers can use to get a thorough understanding of your background. In this article, we will explain what pre-employment screening is and how you can prepare for it.

What is pre-employment screening?

Also sometimes called a “background check,” a pre-employment screening is a verification of your information and background. Employers can use screenings to determine if you can handle sensitive or confidential information and to assess skills that are relevant to the position.

Depending on the job, employers can conduct one or more of these common pre-employment screens:

  • Social security number (SSN) tracing is used to find all of the names, date of birth and addresses associated with that SSN. This trace makes it possible for employers to find areas to search for additional records.

  • Criminal history screenings check records in various local, state, national, federal and even international databases. Some criminal history screenings may require you to submit your fingerprints. Criminal record checks will often include a combination of records derived from multiple sources. They can be done at county, state, federal, or even international levels. Companies can commonly access this data from just online databases.
  • Using those databases to check criminal records is referred to as screen-scraping. This process can sometimes turn up charges against job applicants that are very old or have been dismissed.
  • The general consensus is that the most effective method of getting an accurate picture of a job candidate is to have real people looking through hard copies of records, in order to ensure that they are getting information about the correct person and the true outcome of all criminal cases.
  • Pre-employment screening services are offered by government agencies such as the FBI and the Department of Transportation to employers who want information about driving or criminal records.
  • It’s possible that checking criminal records will protect a company in any negligent hiring lawsuits. However, there are laws in many states which specify just how information from these criminal records can be used when evaluating job candidates.
  • Criminal background checks will often include the following:
  • FBI Fingerprint Database Search – Submitting fingerprints to the FBI database will not necessarily result in a comprehensive picture of a job candidate’s criminal history. That is because the database depends upon local jurisdictions to provide information regarding arrests and their final dispositions. A great deal of information may be missing. This search should comprise only one small part of any pre-employment screening.
  • National Criminal Record Search (NCRD) – This database is constructed from information in the repositories at the municipal, circuit, district, and superior court levels, plus the FBI, Department of Corrections, U.S. Customs, DEA, U.S. Marshal, Department of Justice and Secret Service. It identifies criminal offenses not only where the job candidate has worked or lived, but from all over the country. The national database allows instant access to hundreds of millions of records, including the National Sex Offender Registry.
  • Federal Criminal Records Search – Bank robbery, embezzlement, interstate drug trafficking are just some examples of the type of federal offenses that won’t show up on state and county level searches because they fall under federal jurisdiction. That is why a search of federal crime records is suggested for a thorough pre-employment screening.
  • Statewide Criminal Records Search – Records of felonies and misdemeanors are usually found in the central repositories of each state. The information is provided by courts, corrections, and law enforcement agencies all over the state. However, the quality of these searches can vary widely from state to state, since each one gets to decide how data is imported and who is allowed access to it. The information is not always accurate, or up to date. Depending on the state, the records may not even cover all levels of its court system.
  • County Criminal Record Search – Local county and municipal records will be available through this search.

  • Public records screenings can search motor vehicle records, driving history, credit history, bankruptcy records, workers’ compensation records, civil records and sometimes medical records.

  • Verifications and credentials screenings check the accuracy of your education or degree received, previous employment, professional certifications or licenses, professional references and military service records. Particularly for entry-level employees, employers like to verify a job applicant’s degree, academic performance or major. The Family Right to Privacy Act requires that schools obtain consent from the former student before they release any type of academic records.
  • These reports will verify the dates students attended the academic institution, which fields were studied, the degree earned, grade point averages, and the date of graduation. The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) covers all of the background checks included in an education verification screening.

  • Controlled substance screenings are conducted by a health care provider to ensure your employment complies with company-wide policies on illicit substances.

  • Lie detector or polygraph tests can only be required by companies that provide security services or manufacture or distribute controlled substances. Most private companies are not allowed to use lie detector tests as a form of pre-employment screening. However, certain types of businesses are exempt from this prohibition, such as alarm, guard or armored car services, as well as those who dispense, distribute, or manufacture pharmaceuticals.

  • Pre-employment assessments are tests your potential employer may ask you to take to determine your abilities as they relate to the role.

Drug Testing

Drug testing is probably one of the most common screenings that employers use to ensure that job candidates will be productive employees and as a preventative measure against injuries in the workplace.

Drug tests identify illegal substances potential employees may have ingested or been exposed to. It must be done in strict compliance with laws of the state where the business is located.

Worker’s Compensation Claims History

Screening for worker’s compensation claims that a job applicant has filed in the past is not available in all states. Furthermore, in those states where it is available, it must be conducted in strict compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Credit History Screening

Pre-employment screening of the credit history of job candidates is regulated by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). Employers are not only required to obtain the consent of all applicants to perform such a search, they must also provide the applicant with access to the results.

Still, many employers consider such a screening to be helpful as an indicator of irresponsible behavior if the search turns up financial problems. On the other hand, it is also considered evidence of trustworthiness and reliability if the applicant has a positive report.

Sex Offender Registry Screening

Employers may conduct searches through registries at both the state and Federal level to find out if job applicants are on sex offender lists. This type of pre-employment screening allows them to avoid endangering their staff or tarnishing their reputation by removing sex offenders from their pool of prospective employees.

Motor Vehicle Records Screening

This information comes from a state’s Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) and is usually immediately available. Records of license suspensions, accidents, convictions, violation or any disciplinary actions are included in the results from DMV. Companies whose employees operate motor vehicles in the course of their work, such as trucking, delivery or sales, are most likely to require this type of pre-employment screening.

Employment Verification

Employers verify previous employment listed on resumes and job applications using this type of pre-employment screening. It is also used to check the accuracy of dates of employment, job title, and other related details. However, some of the employers which job candidates list on their resume or application may have policies which limit what type of information they will provide about a former employee.

Another important screening element is to verify that a job applicant is eligible to work in this country. All workers in the United States are required to complete an I-9 Employment Verification Form in order to prove their identity and eligibility.

Supervisor/Reference Interviews

Employers will sometimes want to interview references or former supervisors, in order to evaluate the ability of a candidate to perform the job in question. In these cases, the employers will usually be required to provide written permission from the applicant before anyone will speak with them.

This pre-employment screening will provide information regarding the possibility that a job applicant might prove to be a threat to the economy or national security foreign policy of the United Sates.

A county based search of civil records is commonly used by employers as a guide to a job candidate’s character. This pre-employment screening will reveal lawsuits which are based on the applicant’s failure to fulfill the terms of a contract, it will also reveal all civil lawsuits which have been filed against the potential employee.

A civil records search will also make it easy to see whether a job candidate makes a habit of filing lawsuits. It can be a useful tool for determining whether a potential employee is reliable or not.

Licensing and Professional Certification Verification

Companies will always want to verify that their employees have any licenses that are required for their work. This would include attorneys, medical personnel, engineers, accountants, real estate agents, and more.

The pre-employment screening will reveal whether a license is valid, the expiration date, and whether the applicant has been the subject of any type of disciplinary action.

Military Service Records

Records available on veterans will show the dates served, the type of discharge, and the rank held at time of discharge.

Bankruptcy Records

It’s easy to verify whether a job applicant has filed for bankruptcy. However, employers are prohibited from using that information against the applicant.

Medical Records Verification

Companies are not allowed to check a job candidate’s medical records under any circumstances. They are not even allowed to ask specific questions about a candidate’s medical history.

Applicants may be asked whether they can perform all of the responsibilities of a job. If the answer is yes, an employer has no choice but to accept it as the truth.

One exception is when companies make medical exams a requirement of that job, and all similar ones, so that everyone in those positions are required to undergo an exam. In other words, they can’t require a person who is limping to have a medical exam unless all other applicants are also required to undergo an exam as a requisite of employment.