Suicide effects

Suicide affects all people. Within the past year, about 41,000 individuals died by suicide, 1.3 million adults have attempted suicide, 2.7 million adults have had a plan to attempt suicide and 9.3 million adults have had suicidal thoughts. 

Unfortunately, our society often paints suicide the way they would a prison sentence—a permanent situation that brands an individual. However, suicidal ideation is not a brand or a label, it is a sign that an individual is suffering deeply and must seek treatment. And it is falsehoods like these that can prevent people from getting the help they need to get better.

Debunking the common myths associated with suicide can help society realize the importance of helping others seek treatment and show individuals the importance of addressing their mental health challenges. 

Myth: Suicide only affects individuals with a mental health condition.

Fact: Many individuals with mental illness are not affected by suicidal thoughts and not all people who attempt or die by suicide have mental illness. Relationship problems and other life stressors such as criminal/legal matters, persecution, eviction/loss of home, death of a loved one, a devastating or debilitating illness, trauma, sexual abuse, rejection, and recent or impending crises are also associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts.

Myth: Once an individual is suicidal, he or she will always remain suicidal.

Fact: Active suicidal ideation is often short-term and situation-specific. Studies have shown that approximately 54% of individuals who have died by suicide did not have a diagnosable mental health disorder. And for those with mental illness, the proper treatment can help to reduce symptoms. 

The act of suicide is often an attempt to control deep, painful emotions and thoughts an individual is experiencing. Once these thoughts dissipate, so will the suicidal ideation. While suicidal thoughts can return, they are not permanent. An individual with suicidal thoughts and attempts can live a long, successful life. 

Myth: Most suicides happen suddenly without warning.

Fact: Warning signs—verbally or behaviorally—precede most suicides. Therefore, it’s important to learn and understand the warnings signs associated with suicide. Many individuals who are suicidal may only show warning signs to those closest to them. These loved ones may not recognize what’s going on, which is how it may seem like the suicide was sudden or without warning.

Myth: People who die by suicide are selfish and take the easy way out.

Fact: Typically, people do not die by suicide because they do not want to live—people die by suicide because they want to end their suffering. These individuals are suffering so deeply that they feel helpless and hopeless. Individuals who experience suicidal ideations do not do so by choice. They are not simply, “thinking of themselves,” but rather they are going through a very serious mental health symptom due to either mental illness or a difficult life situation.   

Myth: Talking about suicide will lead to and encourage suicide.

Fact: There is a widespread stigma associated with suicide and as a result, many people are afraid to speak about it. Talking about suicide not only reduces the stigma, but also allows individuals to seek help, rethink their opinions and share their story with others. We all need to talk more about suicide. 

Debunking these common myths about suicide can hopefully allow individuals to look at suicide from a different angle—one of understanding and compassion for an individual who is internally struggling. Maybe they are struggling with a mental illness or maybe they are under extreme pressure and do not have healthy coping skills or a strong support system. 

As a society, we should not be afraid to speak up about suicide, to speak up about mental illness or to seek out treatment for an individual who is in need. Eliminating the stigma starts by understanding why suicide occurs and advocating for mental health awareness within our communities. There are suicide hotlines, mental health support groups, online community resources and many mental health professionals who can help any individual who is struggling with unhealthy thoughts and emotions. 

Air force common admission test (AFCAT)

AFCAT is very popular exam as like upsc competitive exam, many of youngster have a dream to join Indian air force, when they watched movies and any of their idle who are in air force and who are playing a role of Indian air force cadet so, they become more crucial to join the air force. Many of youngsters have a dream to fly fighters plan they can do such thing after clearing these exam, interviews and some physical and medical tests.

 Air Force Common Admission Test is a written exam conducted by Indian Air Force twice every year to induct officers in the IAF. The written exam is followed by Air Force Selection Board Interview for shortlisted candidates.

 It is not tough to crack the AFCAT exam if candidates have prepared well.

 What are the options through AFCAT?

Through AFCAT you can apply for all the three branches of the IAF which are Flying Branch, Technical Branch and Ground Duty Branches. The eligibility criteria for different branches vary. Both men and women can apply for all the three branches. While for women there is short service commission only in all the three branches, for men there is Permanent as well as Short Service Commission for men. However for Flying Branch only Short Service Commission is there through AFCAT. Thus if you clear the written exam and then clear the AFSB also then you have a chance of joining the Air Force Academy.

Eligibility Criteria

  • Flying Branch –Age should lay between to 23 years at the time of course commencement. The candidate must be a Graduate (Minimum three year degree course) in any discipline from a recognized University who have attained minimum 60% marks in aggregate in all papers put together and have passed Math’s and Physics at 10+2 level OR BE / B Tech degree (Four year course) from a recognized University with minimum 60% marks in aggregate in all papers put together.
  • Technical Branch- The age must lay between 18 to 28 years at the time of course commencement.
  • Ground Duty Branch-The age must lie between 20-23 years for Graduates, 20-25 years for Post Graduates, 20-26 years for LLB (Three year course after graduation) and 20-27 years for M.Ed./PhD/CA/ICWA.


AFCAT is an online exam conducted by the Indian air force to get potential officers.

AFCAT exam was started in 2011 as an OMR sheet based paper. In 2019, AFCAT exam went online and many candidates attempted the AFCAT online across the country. 

All AFSB Stage 1 qualified candidates will have to appear for AFSB Stage 2 and undergo the following tests:

  1. Psychological Tests: These are the written psychological tests and are conducted by professional psychologists.
  2. Group Tests: These tests involve mental and physical activities to examine the candidates’ on various mental and physical parameters.
  3. Interview Round: In this round, the interviewing officer takes a personal round of interview for the candidate.
  4. Computerized Pilot Selection System (CPSS) Test: This test is mandatory for only those candidates who have applied for the Flying Branch.

If the candidate clears the Online Tests and both the stages of AFSB Interview then he will be called for Medical Examination.

If you really wants to join Indian air force and serve for our nation, AFCAT is an exam which can give you wings, for all of you who have the dream of working between the sprawling jets can turn this dream into reality through this exam.