WHAT IF?….

Check out what if the whole world has only one language! Everything will become simple. The world of history, technology, medicine, business, and so on might get affected if it happens.

World
World

JOB & BUSINESS:

 Every talented person can get a good job everywhere. Everyone can crack their interview. Everyone can apply for jobs anywhere and have tons of job opportunities. Everyone can deal with the clients effortlessly and can do the projects efficiently. 

Many entrepreneurs can evolve, which creates economic competition between countries. World trade will become easy.

EDUCATION: 

Every child will get an excellent understanding of their studies. Students have vast opportunities to study anywhere. It is easy for the students to discover their talents. Students will be free from academic pressure. The way of education might get changed. Learning new things will become handy for students.

HELP:

 Anyone can help anyone during the emergency times (like accidents). People will become kind-hearted to help a needy person.

There will be no chance of fraud or scandals. Suicides may become less.

Terrorism might get abolished. Medicine for deadly diseases might get founded earlier. People can easily define between good and evil, which might create a massive impact on future generations.

World map
World map

LIFE: 

Men and women can come to a better understanding of each other. No one can use bad words in public. Everyone can express their problem to their government so that the whole world can support them. People can know many events happening in the world. There will be no language division within the country. 

HISTORY:

There’s a chance of many events happening and not. Also, some historical monuments have no chance to exist. Maybe some other historical moments would occur. New inventions might get founded during the early days itself. The world would become more technological than now. Some cultures might get destroyed and, some may be in trend even now.

Why you should be happy?

Sometimes, Everyone will say you should be happy. But Why? Find out!

You’re not alone:

Hey you, Yes you…Listen, buddy everyone is suffering from something in life, it’s not just you. Take your time. Don’t spend your life regretting the decision you made as a mistake. Life is too short! Be happy with what you have. Enjoy your human happiness.

 Why Happiness?

Everyone is making mistakes in every move of their life. You should choose yourself before everything because a positive psychological study shows that happy people can also make people around them happy. It’s simply a boomerang or a science of happiness,

“You’re happy–>Everyone is happy–>You’re happy”

Learn to forgive yourself.

How to be happy?

Okay, this is a quite tough question. You can if you wish!

1.Accept Yourself.
2.Love Yourself.
3.Choose happiness.

Well, this list can go longer. Hold to your positive emotions. In this world happiness, your happiness matter.

 True Happiness?

“Happiness is the consequence of personal effort. You fight for it, strive for it, insist upon it, and sometimes even travel around the world looking for it. You have to participate relentlessly in the manifestations of your blessings. And once you have achieved a state of happiness, you must never become lax about maintaining it. You must make a mighty effort to keep swimming upward into that happiness forever, to stay afloat on top of it.”

― Elizabeth Gilbert

 If You’re not a happy single, you can’t be happy in a relationship. Life is all about how you see, if you’re sad of your misfortune, “It’s okay, Something else is protected for you. Maybe you deserve better.”

“If you get what you want, then it’s God’s direction. If you don’t get what you want it’s God’s protection.”

It’s your pursuit of happiness, in the world of happy people.

Be kind. 

 Be yourself.

Be patient.

The last thing I wanna say is. Don’t hurt anyone. Think before your action. It is okay to be lost, but not too long. 

Discover yourself! Your life begins when you decide to change it!

Happiness is always a choice!

Can Life Be Perfect?

To start with, all of us battle all through life — some more than others. Indeed, even the one individual in the world who battles the most un-actually faces huge difficulties — a piercing battle — on the grounds that they’re a human. It truly isn’t simple being us… you!

Similarly evident, most people are equipped for living in delighted harmony and a characteristic high — feeling satisfied every second. That has been known since old occasions. Understanding this in some capacity, the vast majority of us long for the existence of which we can just dream.

Things being what they are, how would you get from one finish to the next, from the pain that accompanies being a human to the pinnacle life of which individuals are skilled? To help you start that excursion, we should start with this provocative inquiry: Can life be great?

The greater part of your masterminds will quickly shake your head and say, “obviously not. Nothing is great.” Or, “What does consummate even mean? It’s anything but quantifiable.”

Some of you more emotive perusers will say, “obviously, everything is simply amazing the manner in which it is.” You know, the “it’s all acceptable” people. (Obviously, frequently that is until it’s anything but.)

To respond to this significant inquiry, here are a couple of things you should know.

In the first place, individuals will in general compare ‘wonderful’ with ‘ideal.’ I believe they’re extraordinary. ‘Ideal’ to me implies that you have some biased vision. That you are envisioning an ideal, quintessential, cliché best life or thing. Those thoughts generally get embedded into us from our youth and mainstream society, despite the fact that — might I venture to say — we think they are our own.

Second, we are all — we all — customized to look for optimal life, the best mate, youngsters, guardians, adolescence, get-away, future, work, character, outfit for the gathering… you get the thought.

Do those things exist? No, really. They’re just ideal for you. A few things may approach: “Hello, I do look great” or “Amazing, my children are marvelous.” But this normally accompanies a: “indeed, however assuming just _ were a smidgen more… .”

More often than not life, mates, youngsters, guardians, adolescence, the future… .you, don’t approach your expectations and assumptions. We could all compose a book on ran expectations and assumptions. (That occurs, coincidentally, in any event, when things go “well” apparently. Consider the miserable existences of some rich and well-known individuals.)

All in all, there is no optimal anything. Nothing actually can meet the high bar your psyche can make. Which is the reason a large number of you would answer my inquiry with: “By no means, life can’t be great.” And as it were, you’d be correct.

Notwithstanding, ‘wonderful’ can mean something different. It can mean some inborn, worked-in quality that something has on the grounds that it exists. You can see this as the least demanding when you’re genuinely infatuated.

At the point when you’re enamored with an individual, spot or thing, like a child, a darling, or a house, that assists you with coming nearest to seeing its “flawlessness.” You love “your old house” not regardless of the way that it’s anything but current or enormous, but since you consider it to be as having appeal or warmth — possibly stacked with recollections. At the point when you’re enamored, you like the way that your darling has somebody include others wouldn’t track down all that engaging. To you, it makes the person in question “charming.” The child’s crapping and peeing is cute when you’re infatuated with it (a condition normally saved for grandparents).

Things being what they are, I ask you once more, can life be perfect?

Indeed, in case you’re in love with it! That is the way to euphoric harmony and a characteristic high. To feeling satisfied every second.

The Omnipotence of Death

We glorify power, fame and strength when they don’t even stand a chance before the most powerful force, death. In life, there are ups and downs, the powerful and the powerless, rich and poor. But death ultimately levels all these differences and makes everything equal.

The poem ‘Death The Leveller’ by J. Shirley starts with stating that all the glories of humans are mere shadows which appear and disappear after some time. They do not make up an essential part of human life.  This is because there is nothing that can defend us from our fate. We can’t fight against it. When Death lays his cold hand on Kings, they can’t protect themselves and their sceptre and crown are ought to tumble down. The most powerful of all the kings is turned to dust and made equal with the poorest peasant on death. The sceptre and crown are as powerless as scythe and spade.

The glories of our blood and state

Are shadows, not substantial things;

There is no armour against Fate;

Death lays his icy hand on kings:

Sceptre and Crown

Must tumble down,

And in the dust be equal made

With the poor crooked scythe and spade.

The second stanza gives the picture of men in armour. Men fight battles and rejoice fame from killing their foes. Such battles boast bravery, chivalry, and courage. But even the strongest soldier must yield to death. No matter how brave he fights death, sooner or later, he must surrender to fate. He ceases breathing as death slowly creeps up to this captive of fate. Thus, even the strongest soldier is also rendered powerless by death.

Some men with swords may reap the field,

And plant fresh laurels where they kill:

But their strong nerves at last must yield;

They tame but one another still:

Early or late

They stoop to fate,

And must give up their murmuring breath

When they, pale captives, creep to death.

The flowers sing no more of the celebrated deeds once the garland withers. We witness everyone and everything coming to stillness in Death’s kingdom. The word ‘victor-victim’ refers to all the conquerors, emperors, and victors who are victims of Death. The victor-victims bleed and finally lie dead in their cold tomb. Though all turns to nothing, the only thing, which can bloom and spread fragrance, is the actions and good deeds of people who had led a just life. 

The garlands wither on your brow,

Then boast no more your mighty deeds!

Upon Death’s purple altar now

See where the victor-victim bleeds.

Your heads must come

To the cold tomb:

Only the actions of the just

Smell sweet and blossom in their dust.

The only thing which stands the test  of time is the deeds of selflessness and service to fellow beings. Thus, this poem has a moralising tone and shows the omnipotence of death.

10 symptoms that you are going through stress

1. Mood Swings

2. Frequent or easily crying

3. Lack of focus and concentration

4. Emotionally sensitive

5. Anxious about worst-case scenarios

6. Quick lose of temper or irritability

7. Having issues in decision making

8. Irregular sleep or digestive issues

9. Memory/ recall problems

10. No motivation to do anything

These are the symptoms and you have to take care of them by giving attention to them. The first thing is by reading self-help books. Self-books are the best start to cure your stress. It will be hard to start at first but if you go through them for 21 days then it will become a habit for you and as well as your daily routine. Especially in this lockdown, everyone is facing stress because of confided in our homes. We can also install some apps from playstore to destress our stress.

If you can draw well please draw at least one picture a day to defeat your stress demon. after seeing the outcome of our result our heart will feel light. In these covid times, try to step out of your room and go to your terrace to get some good air. Because staying in our rooms increases the chances of negative vibration.

The next thing many people noticed is staying in a toxic relationship. If you are staying in a toxic relationship try to leave that immediately. It is the biggest stress of your life. This toxic relationship might also turn into verbal and physical abuse in later days. The faster you leave the better your future will be.

Try to stay motivated. I know this is the toughest thing to do. But nothing is impossible if we do some regular practices. Try to do at least one good thing in your day. It can be teaching some underprivileged children by joining some NGO. There are lots of NGOs that want people to volunteer to help those young minds. It will be a good deed for your life.

One of the best things to ease our stress is by doing some breathing exercises. Doing breathing exercises will help you to maintain a healthy heart. Sometimes you might feel it is not good to share your problems with others because they will judge you after hearing your story then try to write them in an online journal. This is the best practice followed by many people and it has helped them a lot. Even I wrote my feelings in an online journal. There are lots of apps available in playstore. Install the one which contains password protection. 

Watch some funny series. If you have a Prime subscription then use it to watch series and you can also read books for free if you have a Prime subscription. Kindle provides a Prime Reading feature for Prime subscribers and you can read famous books for free without spending a single penny. When things come for free we should make the best use of them.

We should not underestimate ourselves. We can write things that we are grateful for. Or the achievements we made till now in our life. Try to write a bucket list and set goals for yourself to achieve them. This will help you to prioritize things in your life. 

‘How Did You Die?’ by Edmund Vance Cooke

Why do I have to be born like this? Why can’t I get anything without trouble? Why? Just why? Let’s be true, we have always tried to blame something other than ourselves when we fail. Not everyone is born with silver spoons in their mouths and we shouldn’t excuse ourselves from challenging ourselves to great heights. Maybe we cannot determine our birth, but we can always determine how we are going to live.

Edmund Vance Cooke’s ‘How Did You Die?’ is a motivational poem telling us to go head-on with our challenges in life. Life throws challenges at everyone of us. And when it does, how we react to it is all that matters. Are we going to accept the challenges with a cheerful mindset and strong heart? Or are we going to cower and hide from the outer world? The decision is ours. Where there are challenges, there are troubles. But how we perceive these troubles is up to us. It is our mindset which decides if our troubles are a ton or an ounce. When we challenge ourselves, we are not always going to win. We may fall many times. So, it doesn’t matter how many times we fall, but how many times we pull ourselves up.

Oh, a trouble’s a ton, or a trouble’s an ounce,
Or a trouble is what you make it,
And it isn’t the fact that you’re hurt that counts,
But only how did you take it?

So, what if we fall and get hurt. It isn’t embarrassing. If we had thought so as a child, we wouldn’t be here walking. What is really embarrassing is when we don’t get up after falling down and give up without even seeing the end. All we have to do is put on a smile and get up. A ball bounces up as hard as it hits the floor. Hence, we should be proud of our failures. It doesn’t matter if we fail as long as we have fought well. We should try our best so that we don’t regret it even when we fail. 

The harder you’re thrown, why the higher you bounce;
Be proud of your blackened eye!
It isn’t the fact that you’re licked that counts,
It’s how did you fight —  and why?

If we had fought well and had done our best in whatever role we are given in this mortal world, then the Critic will conclude that we did well. The Critic who will judge us is not the society or family or acquaintances but the Creator, the supreme power. Death comes to everyone. Death doesn’t look at our age, gender, status or power. It treats everyone equally and may come to anyone at any time. Whether we die early or late, whether we die in a moment or experience a slow death, it isn’t our death that matters but how we died. 

Death comes with a crawl, or comes with a pounce,
And whether he’s slow or spry,
It isn’t the fact that you’re dead that counts,
But only how did you die?

We can equalize the phrase ‘how did you die’ to how we lived. Life is full of choices and we may regret some. But we have to make sure that we turn such regrets into life lessons. Maybe we will die today or tomorrow, but would death matter if we live well?    

‘Life is Fine’ by Langston Hughes.

Sometimes, when people ask us how we are, we would want to bawl our eyes out and say “I am not fine”. But there are also days when we can happily say that we are fine. Such is life with all its ups and downs. 

In the poem ‘Life is Fine’, Langston Hughes deals with a darker theme of taking one’s own life. The first stanza starts with the narrator sitting down by a river bank and trying to figure out something. It  is clear that the poet is worried and is trying to think about it. When he can’t find answers for his problems, he throws himself into the river. This comes as a surprise to a reader at first when one doesn’t know the theme of the poem. 

But instead of drowning, the narrator comes up. He hollers and cries for help. The narrator reasons out that he didn’t die because it was too cold to bear. He seems to have backed out at the last moment. He repeatedly says it was because the water was cold as if trying to console himself. 

I came up once and hollered!

I came up twice and cried!

If that water hadn’t a-been so cold

I might’ve sunk and died. 

  But it was      Cold in that water!      It was cold!

The narrator tries to kill himself for the second time when he is going up in an elevator. He plans to throw himself out of the elevator. Also, readers come to know the reason for his suicide attempts. He is missing someone to whom he refers as ‘baby’.

But he doesn’t jump off the elevator because it is too high. It is quite ironic how the narrator is more concerned about the physical pain caused by death. Readers also come to understand the vulnerable mindset of the narrator. It is obvious the narrator is suffering and is in pain.

I stood there and I hollered!

I stood there and I cried!

If it hadn’t a-been so high

I might’ve jumped and died.

In the concluding stanzas, the narrator complies with reality and decides to go on living. He decides to live simply because he was born to live. He could have died in place of his beloved, but he can’t because he was destined to live his life.   

So since I’m still here livin’,

I guess I will live on.

I could’ve died for love—

But for livin’ I was born

While he continues to live on, he might suffer and cry. He may have more painful experiences, but he is resolute to live. He is earnest to live. He assures his beloved that he will live and not die.   

Though you may hear me holler,

And you may see me cry—

I’ll be dogged, sweet baby,

If you gonna see me die.

He ends the poem with the line,

Life with all its pain and suffering may appear fine when we are resolute to live on. We may go through hard times, but it may not appear hard when we live on. When we grow old, we understand what to cling onto in life and what to leave behind. Thus, this poem which starts with a gloomy theme ends with an optimistic message that life is fine as long as we continue to live. So, let’s live.

    Life is fine!      Fine as wine!      Life is fine!

‘On Running after One’s Hat’ by G K Chesterton.

“I am done with it! I am irritated! This is frustrating! Why does it happen only to me?”

We face problems everyday and life for no reason keeps throwing something at us. Even when our toe gets hit by furniture, we start cursing and stressing. No matter how trivial or challenging a problem is, we constantly worry about it. But all these problems can be romanticized as adventures after reading G K Chesterton’s essay ‘On Running after One’s Hat’.

The essay starts with Chesterton envying people who were in London when it was flooded. He says that Battersea (a place in London) has always been beautiful and the addition of water has made it appear like Venice. He imagines the boat that bought the meat to have moved with the elegance and smoothness of a gondola (a long and narrow boat). 

“There is nothing so perfectly poetical as an island; and when a district is flooded it becomes an archipelago.”

The optimism of the essayist makes him romanticize the flood which we would normally think of as bringing misfortune, destruction and loss.

“The true optimist who sees in such things an opportunity for enjoyment is quite as logical and much more sensible than the ordinary.”

Most of the instances which we perceive as inconveniences are completely related to our mentality and outlook. The essayist gives an instance for example. When there is a delay in the arrival of the train, the grown-ups complain while the children never do. This is because for children, a railway station appears like a ‘cavern of wonder and a palace of poetical pleasure’. The red and green lights of the signal appear to them as the new sun and moon. So if we view such inconveniences as children do, we shall no more perceive them as inconveniences. All the so-called inconveniences depend on how we view it. 

The second instance the essayist gives is running after one’s hat. Many find it unpleasant to run after their hats after being blown away by wind. They run after a ball in a game but not after their own hat as they find it is humiliating.

“When people say it is humiliating they mean it is comic.”

People find it embarrassing as they are laughed at by other onlookers. Their fretful pursuit serves as a source of laughter. But it is all right because everything a human does is comical.

He also says that running after one’s hat has the potential of becoming a sport and it can be an alternative to poaching. “He might regard himself as a jolly huntsman pursuing a wild animal,…”. The essayist imagines it to be a common sport among the upper class. They would have their personal assistants run after the hat on a windy day and it would provide them a hearty laughter. This will be less painful than animal hunting too. The essayist says that we should be relieved of distress if our actions can provide laughter for others.

The essayist recalls how his friend struggled with a jammed drawer everyday. So, he points out to his friend that he is always finding the drawer troublesome because he always opens it while thinking that it should be easy to open the drawer. He says that the main problem lies with his friend’s outlook. Hence, he advises his friend to think of himself as “pulling against some powerful and oppressive enemy” or as participating in some fearsome tug war. If he imagines such situations when pulling the drawer, then it will no longer be an inconvenience but an adventure.

So, if we develop a positive outlook on everything that we encounter everyday, maybe life won’t be as hard as we think. After all,

“An adventure is only an inconvenience rightly considered. An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered.”

‘The Darkling Thrush’ by Thomas Hardy.

Times are bad. Everything around us seems doleful and gloomy. Of the disasters we had only read in fiction, are now crawling out of the pages. At this time, all we want to find is hope. Hope , which consoles us that things will get better, expectations of the long nightmare ending and a belief that we too can resurrect ourselves like phoenix are those to which we dearly cling to.  

Similarly, the poem ‘The Darkling Thrush’ is also set in a sombre mood. When the poem starts, we find the poet looking at everything as disconsolate. He is at his gate looking at the frost covered surroundings. The frost has made everything look pale like a ghost. The sun is setting and the day is coming to an end. Even the bine-stems are lifeless this winter. The lanes which would usually be bustling with humans are now forlorn. Winter has shut men into their houses and men huddle around the hearth to feel the warmth.

“And all mankind that haunted nigh

Had sought their household fires.” 

These lines made me think that no matter how cold the outer world is, we feel warmth once inside our home. This warmth comes from our loved ones and it makes us not give up yet. 

When we learn the fact that this poem was written on the 29th of December in 1900, we understand the context of the second stanza better. It wasn’t just the end of the year but also of the century. It may even be considered as a dirge to the ending century. The land is referred to as the corpse of the century with the clouds forming its crypt and wind lamenting the death of the century. There is no trace of life. Even the germs and microorganisms from which we were born are also lying frozen beneath the frozen ground. Everything the poet sees looks as passionless as him.

“And every spirit upon earth

Seemed fervourless as I.”

In the third stanza, the poet finds the most extraordinary thing happening. A sweet singing voice vibrates through the air. It is full of happiness and uncontrollable joy. It is a thrush. It’s appearance isn’t so grand. It is old, weak, small and scruffy. But it pours its soul into the song as the day is darkening.

“An aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small,

In blast-beruffled plume,

Had chosen thus to fling his soul

Upon the growing gloom.”

It is interesting to note the description of the thrush. It is almost battered out of life yet it sings full of life and energy. Though we are worn out, though we are exhausted, we should never give up for we don’t know what lies ahead and for we haven’t opened all the doors.

 There is nothing notable in the surrounding which would inspire the thrush to sing. There is nothing so full of life like that ‘ecstatic sound’ near and far. The thrush singing is out of place and odd. But it carried with it something that was unknown to the poet. The bird knew of the ‘Hope’ that the poet failed to see. 

“That I could think there trembled through

His happy good-night air

Some blessed Hope, whereof he knew

And I was unaware.”

Though the surrounding is dreary and dull, the thrush knew that it wouldn’t be the same forever. The winter will eventually end; new things will spring from the ground; the lanes will once again be bustling with life. This the poet did not understand. The last lines of this poem also reminded me of the last line of Shelley’s ‘Ode to the West Wind’.

“If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind?”

We all should be like the little thrush. Finding hope and giving hope. All I want to say is – this too will pass away, and when tomorrow comes, it will be brighter than today.

‘Walking Tours’ by R L Stevenson.

“It must not be imagined that a walking tour, as some would have us fancy, is merely a better or worse way of seeing the country.”

R L Stevenson’s ‘Walking Tours’ guides us to the method of enjoying a ‘walking tour’. The essay which starts with relishing the ‘walking’ ends on an unexpected note of self reflection.

Miles and miles of walk may sound exhausting but it is not so when one reads this essay. If a tour is all about viewing landscapes and picturesque places, then a train would make for a satisfactory travel. But a walking tour starts with hope and spirit and ends with replenishing ourselves with peace and spirit. A person will find pleasure after pleasure during the walk.

When going on such a tour, one shouldn’t be an ‘over walker’ for they will not comprehend the purpose of the travel. To cover a long distance by walking fast is merely to brutalize one’s own body. An over walker will neither enjoy the evening sky nor the journey and his physical exhaustion will put him to sleep. 

“It is the fate of such an one to take twice as much trouble as is needed to obtain happiness and miss happiness in the end…”

To enjoy the walking tour to the fullest, one has to go alone. For if one goes with a company or as pairs, it will be more like a picnic. In a walking tour, one should enjoy the liberty to stop and then continue. 

“…you must be open to all impressions and let your thoughts take color from what you see. You should be as a pipe for any wind to play upon.”

In the beginning of the tour, it might be difficult and one would have the urge to give up. In this case, one is to take off their knapsack, enjoy a short break and “ give three leaps and go on singing”. This will improve the mood and soon the spirit of the journey will enter them. If one constantly ponders over their anxieties and worries, which like the merchant Abudah’s chest never empties, they will never be happy about the walk. 

There are instances where one will be joined by other wayfarers. Of them is this one who walks fast with a keen look all concentrated on setting the landscape to words. There is this one who stops at each canal to look at the dragonflies and each gate to look upon cows. There is another who is busy talking, muttering, laughing and gesticulating to themselves; definitely composing the most passionate oration and articles.

There will also be that person who will sing even though he is not a master in that art. It is all fine until he comes across a stolid peasant. This person may be misunderstood for a lunatic for no reason can explain their gaiety to the passers-by. This is completely possible in a walking tour for when surrounded by pleasant things, a person will definitely skip, run, and laugh out of nowhere. Here the essayist quotes Hazlitt who had said,

“Give me the clear blue sky over my head, and green turf beneath my feet, a winding road before me,…I laugh, I run, I leap, I sing for joy.” 

Though the essayist had quoted it, he is against leaping and running because these actions breaks the natural rhythm of respiration and break the pace. But when one is on an equable stride, there requires no conscious thought to keep one going and it neither does engage the mind. A walking tour gives us a sense of physical wellbeing, a delightful play of fresh air, contraction of thigh muscles and makes him relish the solitude. 

“He becomes more and more incorporated with the material landscape, and the open air drunkenness grows upon him with great strides, until he posts along the road, and sees everything about him, as in a cheerful dream.”

The essayist stresses on bivouacs as a necessary part of the walking tour. One may dally time as long as one wishes to. It feels like prolonging the time and slowing it down. This is what we people in the industrial era miss. Being in a constant race with time, we have forgotten to live the time. 

“You have no idea, unless you have tried it, how endlessly long is a summer’s day, that you measure out only be hunger, and bring to an end only when you are drowsy.”

The essayist draws near conclusion with a talk on an evening’s rest after a long walk. We throw ourselves into the hands of nature and bring down all our guards.

“And it seems as if a hot walk has purged you, more than of anything else, of all narrowness and pride, and left curiosity to play  its part freely, as in a child of a man of science.”

When the night leaves us alone, we are free to reflect on the way we have led our lives. We are all running after our desires and greeds, we have failed to understand how ephemeral life is.  The essayist puts out lines which makes the readers to question themselves. 

“We are in such a haste to be doing, to be writing, to be gathering gear, to make our voice audible a moment in a derisive silence of eternity, that we forget that one thing, of which these are but the parts — namely, to live.”

“We fall in love, we drink hard, we run to and fro upon the earth like frightened sheep. And now you are to ask yourself if … to remember the faces of women without desire, to be pleased by the great deeds of men without envy, to be everything and everywhere in sympathy, and yet content to remain where and what you are — is not this to know both wisdom and virtue, and to dwell with happiness?”

These lines make us reflect on ourselves. It urges us to ask ourselves when was the last time we were happy, are we happy, are we living, what have we left for the world. These profound questions are for us to think. Maybe there will be no answer. To think and to live our life from here onwards is all that matters. When times get better and when you are to live, go on a walking tour.

“And whether it was wise or foolish, tomorrow’s travel will carry you, body and mind, into some different parish of the infinite.”